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What's the best way of displaying page navigation for many, many pages?

(Initially this was posted as a how-to tip with my answer included in the question. I've now split my answer off into the "answers" section below).


To be more specific:

Suppose you're displaying a set of records to the user, broken up into fixed-size pages (like the results of a Google search, for example). If there are only a few pages, you can display a page navigation area at the end of the results that might look like this:

[ << ] [<] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 [ > ] [ >> ]

But this quickly becomes unweildy if there are much more than 20 or 30 pages of results.

Sometimes you'll see things like this:

[ << ] [<] ... 665 666 667 668 669 670 671 672 673 ... [ > ] [ >> ]

or this:

[ << ] [<] 1 2 3 ... 667 668 669 670 671 ... 845 846 847 [ > ] [ >> ]

but in both cases, navigating to anywhere in the middle of the "..." sections would take many, many mousclicks. Sometimes an input box for entering the page number directly is provided; otherwise (assuming we're talking about a webpage here) the savvy user is likely to look at the URL to see if they can edit it directly.

What would be nice would be to have a pagination display that lets the user reach any page in only a few mouseclicks, without having ridiculously many links.

How would that best be achieved?

share|improve this question
2  
Who would want to go to page 494 directly, given one's not super smart and knows which content is on what page? –  webjunkie Mar 15 '12 at 16:57
    
webjunkie, you wouldn't. However you might guess that what you're after is in the high 400s (say) and want to get to that region in only a click or two (instead of 100s of clicks). Then when you're on page 500 you might realize you're a little to high, so you'd try p.490, then 495, and finally you'd find what you need on 494. This style of search requires you to be able to move around in both small and large jumps, to quickly reach any page. This is what my logarithmic pagination method allows for. –  Doin Mar 16 '12 at 20:33
    
I like your thinking. However, Stackoverflow is a question and answer site and it's not recommended to post 'howtos'. You should split your post into a question and an answer. It is ok to answer your own question and it gives others a chance to provide their own answers too. –  kristianp Jan 6 '13 at 4:49
    
kristianp: done. For others reading this, the first two comments above really apply more to my answer below, not to the question itself (initially I posted the answer as part of the 'question'). –  Doin Jan 7 '13 at 10:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's my solution - use "Logarithmic Page Navigation":

This can be achieved by having page numbers distributed logarithmically, according to distance from either the endpoints or the current page. Here's an example of what I mean:

1 2 3 4 5 6 . 10 . 20 . 30 . 40 . 50 .. 100 .. 200 . 210 . 220 . 230 . 240 . 250 . 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 . 270 . 280 . 290 . 300 . 310 .. 400 .. 500 .. 600 .. 700 .. 800 .. 900 .. 950 . 960 . 970 . 980 . 990 . 995 996 997 998 999 1000

Notice how in the gaps, numbering goes from 1s, to 10s, to 100s (etc.). (I use powers of 10, but in principle you could use a different scheme - powers of 2, say).

I wrote some code that does this back in 2004, and thought I'd share it here. There are PHP and ASP versions, but the logic ought to be simple to translate into any language. Note that the bit at the bottom (in both cases) just displays some examples. Obviously the formatting will need customization to match your webpage (or application), so it's pretty basic here. Alter LINKS_PER_STEP in paginationHTML to determine how many numbers get displayed before the step size increases, as you move away from the endpoints or current page.

For a more compact output you could also consider altering the code so that the numbering is not "dense" around the endpoints (i.e. dense only around the current page).

Here's the code:

PHP version:

<?

// Used by paginationHTML below...
function paginationLink($p, $page, $URL)
{
  if ($p==$page) return '<b style="color:#C0C0C0">' . $p . '</b>';
  return '<a href="' . $URL . $p . '">' . $p . '</a>';
}


// Used by paginationHTML below...
function paginationGap($p1, $p2)
{
  $x = $p2-$p1;
  if ($x==0) return '';
  if ($x==1) return ' ';
  if ($x<=10) return ' . ';
  if ($x<=100) return ' .. ';
  return ' ... ';
}


// URL requires the $page number be appended to it.
// e.g. it should end in '&page=' or something similar.
function paginationHTML($page, $lastPage, $URL)
{
  $LINKS_PER_STEP = 5;

  // Nav buttons

  if ($page>1)
    $result = '<form action="' . $URL . '1" method="POST" style="display:inline"><input type="submit" value="&nbsp;|&lt;&nbsp;"></form>&nbsp;' .
              '<form action="' . $URL . ($page-1) . '" method="POST" style="display:inline"><input type="submit" value="&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;"></form>';
  else $result = '<input type="button" value="&nbsp;|&lt;&nbsp;" disabled>&nbsp;<input type="button" value="&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;" disabled>';

  $result .= '&nbsp;&nbsp;' . $page . '&nbsp;&nbsp;';
  if ($page<$lastPage)
    $result .= '<form action="' . $URL . ($page+1) . '" method="POST" style="display:inline"><input type="submit" value="&nbsp;&gt;&nbsp;"></form>&nbsp;' .
               '<form action="' . $URL . $lastPage . '" method="POST" style="display:inline"><input type="submit" value="&nbsp;&gt;|&nbsp;"></form>';
  else $result .= '<input type="button" value="&nbsp;&gt;&nbsp;" disabled>&nbsp;<input type="button" value="&nbsp;&gt;|&nbsp;" disabled>';
  $result .= "<br>";

  // Now calculate page links...

  $lastp1 = 1;
  $lastp2 = $page;
  $p1 = 1;
  $p2 = $page;
  $c1 = $LINKS_PER_STEP+1;
  $c2 = $LINKS_PER_STEP+1;
  $s1 = '';
  $s2 = '';
  $step = 1;
  while (true)
  {
    if ($c1>=$c2)
    {
      $s1 .= paginationGap($lastp1,$p1) . paginationLink($p1,$page,$URL);
      $lastp1 = $p1;
      $p1 += $step;
      $c1--;
    }
    else
    {
      $s2 = paginationLink($p2,$page,$URL) . paginationGap($p2,$lastp2) . $s2;
      $lastp2 = $p2;
      $p2 -= $step;
      $c2--;
    }
    if ($c2==0)
    {
      $step *= 10;
      $p1 += $step-1;         // Round UP to nearest multiple of $step
      $p1 -= ($p1 % $step);
      $p2 -= ($p2 % $step);   // Round DOWN to nearest multiple of $step
      $c1 = $LINKS_PER_STEP;
      $c2 = $LINKS_PER_STEP;
    }
    if ($p1>$p2)
    {
      $result .= $s1 . paginationGap($lastp1,$lastp2) . $s2;
      if (($lastp2>$page)||($page>=$lastPage)) return $result;
      $lastp1 = $page;
      $lastp2 = $lastPage;
      $p1 = $page+1;
      $p2 = $lastPage;
      $c1 = $LINKS_PER_STEP;
      $c2 = $LINKS_PER_STEP+1;
      $s1 = '';
      $s2 = '';
      $step = 1;
    }
  }
}

?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(1,1,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(2,3,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(3,3,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(73,100,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(4,100,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(257,1000,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(7062,10555,'?page=')?>

<br><br><br>
<?=paginationHTML(22080,503456,'?page=')?>

ASP version:

<%

' Used by paginationHTML below...
Function paginationLink(p, page, URL)
  if p=page then
    paginationLink = "<b style=""color:#C0C0C0"">" & p & "</b>"
  else
    paginationLink = "<a href=""" & URL & p & """>" & p & "</a>"
  end if
End Function


' Used by paginationHTML below...
Function paginationGap(p1, p2)
  Dim x
  x = p2-p1
  if x=0 then
    paginationGap = ""
  elseif x=1 then
    paginationGap = " "
  elseif x<=10 then
    paginationGap = " . "
  elseif x<=100 then
    paginationGap = " .. "
  else
    paginationGap = " ... "
  end if
End Function


' URL requires the page number be appended to it.
' e.g. it should end in "&page=" or something similar.
Function paginationHTML(page, lastPage, URL)
  const LINKS_PER_STEP = 5
  Dim p1, p2, c1, c2, s1, s2, lastp1, lastp2, step

  ' Nav buttons
  if page>1 then
    paginationHTML = "<form action=""" & URL & "1"" method=""POST"" style=""display:inline""><input type=""submit"" value=""&nbsp;|&lt;&nbsp;""></form>&nbsp;" & _
                    "<form action=""" & URL & (page-1) & """ method=""POST"" style=""display:inline""><input type=""submit"" value=""&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;""></form>"
  else
    paginationHTML = "<input type=""button"" value=""&nbsp;|&lt;&nbsp;"" disabled>&nbsp;<input type=""button"" value=""&nbsp;&lt;&nbsp;"" disabled>"
  end if
  paginationHTML = paginationHTML & "&nbsp;&nbsp;" & page & "&nbsp;&nbsp;"
  if page<lastPage then
    paginationHTML = paginationHTML & "<form action=""" & URL & (page+1) & """ method=""POST"" style=""display:inline""><input type=""submit"" value=""&nbsp;&gt;&nbsp;""></form>&nbsp;" & _
                                    "<form action=""" & URL & lastPage & """ method=""POST"" style=""display:inline""><input type=""submit"" value=""&nbsp;&gt;|&nbsp;""></form>"
  else
    paginationHTML = paginationHTML & "<input type=""button"" value=""&nbsp;&gt;&nbsp;"" disabled>&nbsp;<input type=""button"" value=""&nbsp;&gt;|&nbsp;"" disabled>"
  end if
  paginationHTML = paginationHTML & "<br>"

  ' Now calculate page links...

  lastp1 = 1
  lastp2 = page
  p1 = 1
  p2 = page
  c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1
  c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1
  s1 = ""
  s2 = ""
  step = 1
  do
    if c1>=c2 then
      s1 = s1 & paginationGap(lastp1, p1) & paginationLink(p1, page, URL)
      lastp1 = p1
      p1 = p1+step
      c1 = c1-1
    else
      s2 = paginationLink(p2, page, URL) & paginationGap(p2, lastp2) & s2
      lastp2 = p2
      p2 = p2-step
      c2 = c2-1
    end if
    if c2=0 then
      step = step*10
      p1 = p1+step-1         ' Round UP to nearest multiple of step
      p1 = p1-(p1 mod step)
      p2 = p2-(p2 mod step)  ' Round DOWN to nearest multiple of step
      c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP
      c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP
    end if
    if p1>p2 then
      paginationHTML = paginationHTML & s1 & paginationGap(lastp1, lastp2) & s2
      if (lastp2>page) or (page>=lastPage) then exit do
      lastp1 = page
      lastp2 = lastPage
      p1 = page+1
      p2 = lastPage
      c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP
      c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1
      s1 = ""
      s2 = ""
      step = 1
    end if
  loop
End Function

%>


<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(1,1,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(2,3,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(3,3,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(73,100,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(4,100,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(257,1000,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(7062,10555,"?page=")%>

<br><br><br>
<%=paginationHTML(22080,503456,"?page=")%>

Javascript version (within complete test page):

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
  <title>Logarithmic Pagination Demo</title>
  <style>

body {background:#C0C0C0;font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px;text-align:left}
div {margin:0;padding:0}
div#setupDiv {margin:40px;text-align:center}
table#datarows {border-collapse:collapse;margin:40px auto}
table#datarows th {padding:5px 10px;background:#80B0FF;color:#FFFFFF;border:2px solid #80B0FF;width:1000px;text-align:center}
table#datarows td {padding:2px 10px;background:#FFFFFF;color:#D0D0D0;border:2px solid #80B0FF;width:1000px;text-align:left;font-style:italic}
input.err {border:2px solid #FF0000;background-color:#FFF0F0}
form.pager {display:table;margin:0 auto;padding:20px;border:2px solid #E0E0E0;border-radius:10px;background-color:#D0D0D0;text-align:left;white-space:nowrap}
form#pager1 {margin-top:40px}
form#pager2 {margin-bottom:60px}
form.pager div {display:table-cell;vertical-align:middle;padding:0 20px;white-space:nowrap}
form.pager div + div {border-left:2px solid #E0E0E0}
form.pager div.plinks {padding:0;border:0 none;font-size:14px;line-height:24px;max-width:800px;white-space:normal}
form.pager div.plinks b {display:inline-block;vertical-align:bottom;font-size:24px;line-height:21px;height:24px;overflow:hidden;color:#808080}
form.pager div.plinks a {text-decoration:none;color:black}
form.pager div.plinks a:hover {color:#0000FF;font-weight:bold}
form.pager div.plinks + div {border:0 none}

  </style>
  <script>

var NumPages, RecsPerPage, els1, els2, plinks1, plinks2;

function setupClick()
{
  var el, n, r;
  el = document.getElementById("NumPages");
  el.className = ((n = (el.value >>> 0)) ? "" : "err");
  el = document.getElementById("RecsPerPage");
  el.className = ((r = (el.value >>> 0)) ? "" : "err");
  if (n&&r) { NumPages = n; RecsPerPage = r; setupServerPage(); }
}

// This function sets up what would normally be part of the server's HTML output.
function setupServerPage()
{
  var totRecs = NumPages * RecsPerPage, tbdy = document.getElementById("datarows").tBodies[0], l = tbdy.rows.length;
  document.getElementById("plength1").innerHTML = document.getElementById("plength2").innerHTML = totRecs + " record" + ((totRecs===1)?"":"s") + "<br>" + NumPages + " page" + ((NumPages===1)?"":"s");
  els1["pcount"].value = els2["pcount"].value = NumPages;
  while (l>RecsPerPage) tbdy.deleteRow(--l);
  while (l<RecsPerPage) tbdy.insertRow(l++).insertCell(0).innerHTML = "Some data...";
  pageNavigate(1);
}

// This would be handled by a return trip to the server, if not using AJAX.
function pageClick(e)
{
  e = e||window.event;
  var s = e.target||e.srcElement, n, p, el;
  if (s.tagName==="A") { n = (p = s.href).lastIndexOf("=")+1; pageNavigate(p.substring(n) >>> 0); return false; }
  else if ((s.tagName!=="INPUT")||(s.type!=="submit")) return;
  if (!(n = s.name)) { p = ((el = this.elements["p"]).value >>> 0); if ((p<=0)||(p>NumPages)) { el.className = "err"; return false; }}
  else if (n==="p1") p = 1;
  else if (n==="pprev") p = (this.elements["pcurr"].value >>> 0)-1;
  else if (n==="pnext") p = (this.elements["pcurr"].value >>> 0)+1;
  else if (n==="plast") p = (this.elements["pcount"].value >>> 0);
  pageNavigate(p);
  return false;
}

// This would also be handled by a return trip to the server, or else data records could be retrieved via AJAX.
function pageNavigate(p)
{
  els1["p"].className = els2["p"].className = els1["p"].value = els2["p"].value = "";
  if (p<1) p = 1; else if (p>NumPages) p = NumPages;
  els1["p1"].disabled = els2["p1"].disabled = els1["pprev"].disabled = els2["pprev"].disabled = (p===1);
  els1["pnext"].disabled = els2["pnext"].disabled = els1["plast"].disabled = els2["plast"].disabled = (p===NumPages);
  els1["pcurr"].value = els2["pcurr"].value = p;
  // if the server is handling this, insert NON-logarithmic page links here (can be just first, current, and last page).
  plinks1.innerHTML = plinks2.innerHTML = logarithmicPaginationLinks(NumPages,p,"?p=");
}

// This function produces the logarithmic pagination links.
function logarithmicPaginationLinks(lastPage,matchPage,linkURL)
{
  function pageLink(p, page) { return ((p===page) ? "<b>"+p+"</b>" : '<a href="'+linkURL+p+'">'+p+"</a>"); }
  function pageGap(x) { if (x===0) return ""; if (x===1) return " "; if (x<=10) return " . "; if (x<=100) return " .. "; return " ... "; }

  var page = (matchPage ? matchPage : 1), LINKS_PER_STEP = 5, lastp1 = 1, lastp2 = page, p1 = 1, p2 = page, c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1, c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1, s1 = "", s2 = "", step = 1, linkHTML = "";

  while (true)
  {
    if (c1>=c2)
    {
      s1 += pageGap(p1-lastp1) + pageLink(p1,matchPage);
      lastp1 = p1;
      p1 += step;
      c1--;
    }
    else
    {
      s2 = pageLink(p2,matchPage) + pageGap(lastp2-p2) + s2;
      lastp2 = p2;
      p2 -= step;
      c2--;
    }
    if (c2===0)
    {
      step *= 10;
      p1 += step-1;        // Round UP to nearest multiple of step
      p1 -= (p1 % step);
      p2 -= (p2 % step);   // Round DOWN to nearest multiple of step
      c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
      c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
    }
    if (p1>p2)
    {
      linkHTML += s1 + pageGap(lastp2-lastp1) + s2;
      if ((lastp2>page)||(page>=lastPage)) break;
      lastp1 = page;
      lastp2 = lastPage;
      p1 = page+1;
      p2 = lastPage;
      c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
      c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP+1;
      s1 = '';
      s2 = '';
      step = 1;
    }
  }
  return linkHTML;
}

window.onload = function()
{
  els1 = document.getElementById("pager1").elements;
  els2 = document.getElementById("pager2").elements;
  plinks1 = document.getElementById("plinks1");
  plinks2 = document.getElementById("plinks2")
  document.getElementById("pager1").onclick = document.getElementById("pager2").onclick = pageClick;
  (document.getElementById("setupDiv").lastChild.onclick = setupClick)();
}

  </script>
</head>
<body>
  <div id="setupDiv">Select number of pages: <input type="text" id="NumPages" value="100" size="7"> &nbsp; &nbsp; and records per page:  <input type="text" id="RecsPerPage" value="20" size="7"> &nbsp; &nbsp; <input type="button" value=" Go "></div>

  <hr>

  <form id="pager1" class="pager" method="GET"><input type="hidden" name="pcount" value=""><input type="hidden" name="pcurr" value="1">
    <div>Go to page: <input type="text" name="p" size="7"> <input type="submit" value=" Go "></div>
    <div><input type="submit" name="p1" value=" |< " disabled> <input type="submit" name="pprev" value=" < " disabled></div>
    <div id="plinks1" class="plinks"></div>
    <div><input type="submit" name="pnext" value=" > "> <input type="submit" name="plast" value=" >| "></div>
    <div id="plength1"></div>
  </form>

  <table id="datarows"><thead><tr><th>Column Heading...</th></tr></thead><tbody></tbody></table>


  <form id="pager2" class="pager" method="GET"><input type="hidden" name="pcount" value=""><input type="hidden" name="pcurr" value="1">
    <div>Go to page: <input type="text" name="p" size="7"> <input type="submit" value=" Go "></div>
    <div><input type="submit" name="p1" value=" |< " disabled> <input type="submit" name="pprev" value=" < " disabled></div>
    <div id="plinks2" class="plinks"></div>
    <div><input type="submit" name="pnext" value=" > "> <input type="submit" name="plast" value=" >| "></div>
    <div id="plength2"></div>
  </form>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
It seems someone has gone and developed a WordPress pagination plugin based on my post here: wordpress.org/plugins/wp-lopa Woo-hoo!!! –  Doin Jan 9 '14 at 15:49
1  
I've added a jsFiddle demo of how this works in practice, with nice CSS and everything here: jsfiddle.net/m4Sf8 –  Doin Jun 27 '14 at 23:33
    
...and added it to my answer, in case someone doesn't like jsFiddle. –  Doin Jun 27 '14 at 23:52
    
I can't touch that code. I wish. I wanted to have it return a list of page numbers instead. No worries. The fiddle is impressive. –  Stephane Eybert Aug 27 '14 at 19:13
    
Sorry Stephane, I'm not sure I understand... what did you want to have return a list of page numbers? –  Doin Aug 28 '14 at 20:53

Simplified version of "Logarithmic Page Navigation" in JavaScript:

Generates dropdown menu. This sample just document.write's it but you can develop it further according to your need (add onChange, etc). Javascript conversion thanks to http://www.basereality.com/PHPToJavascript.

<script>

    function paginationLink(p, page)
    {
        if (p == page)
            return '<option selected value="' + p + '">' + p + '</option>';
        return '<option value="' + p + '">' + p+ '</option>';
    }

    function paginationHTML(page, lastPage)
    {
        var LINKS_PER_STEP = 5;

        // Now calculate page links...
        var lastp1 = 1;
        var lastp2 = page;
        var p1 = 1;
        var p2 = page;
        var c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP + 1;
        var c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP + 1;
        var s1 = '';
        var s2 = '';
        var step = 1;
        var result = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            if (c1 >= c2)
            {
                s1 += paginationLink(p1, page);
                lastp1 = p1;
                p1 += step;
                c1--;
            }
            else
            {
                s2 = paginationLink(p2, page) + s2;
                lastp2 = p2;
                p2 -= step;
                c2--;
            }
            if (c2 == 0)
            {
                step *= 10;
                p1 += step - 1;         // Round UP to nearest multiple of $step
                p1 -= (p1 % step);
                p2 -= (p2 % step);   // Round DOWN to nearest multiple of $step
                c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
                c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
            }
            if (p1 > p2)
            {
                result += s1 + s2;
                if ((lastp2 > page) || (page >= lastPage))
                    return result;
                lastp1 = page;
                lastp2 = lastPage;
                p1 = page + 1;
                p2 = lastPage;
                c1 = LINKS_PER_STEP;
                c2 = LINKS_PER_STEP + 1;
                s1 = '';
                s2 = '';
                step = 1;
            }
        }
    }

    document.write('Menu generated with JavaScript <select>' + paginationHTML(765, 5055))+'</select>';

</script>
share|improve this answer

How about:

a) add <-100 <-10 [pagination] +10> +100> instead of blow up the pagination itself

b) offer a direct page input [# .. ] [ view ] , filter the input against the valid page range

c) needs some proper coding, but: expand the inner, floating range by say +/-10, +/-25, +/-100 page instead of blowing up the complete paging range

share|improve this answer
    
(b) is usually a good idea, but it's in addition to page navigation links, not a replacement for them. Neither (a) nor (c) really address the problem of quickly navigating to any point in a very large list (and (c) could result in a very large number of links, and also would introduce potentially confusing new UI elements). The point about logarithmic pagination is that it scales elegantly from 10s of pages to 10s of million pages (or more), with a UI that's both efficient and easily understood. –  Doin Feb 23 '13 at 6:41
    
Actually, now that I think about it, if you wanted to, you could easily add feature (c) to my logarithmic pagination algorithm without too much work. You end up with a "flat" list of links centered on the current page, and "logarithmic" links into the remainder of the page list on either side. (How big you make the "flat" part and whether it's size is user-adjustable is up to you, and depends on the requirements of you application, of course). –  Doin Feb 23 '13 at 6:48
    
Ah, I think I may have misinterpreted your suggestion (a). Maybe you meant +10> +100> +1000> +10000> ... etc, auto-adjusting depending on (the logarithm of) the number of pages? However if you simply replace the +n, -n with absolute page numbers, this is basically a minor variation of the logarithmic scheme above (just slightly changed parameters, and using my suggestion of not making the page links "dense" at the endpoints, for compactness). Absolute page numbers are probably better than relative (e.g. -10, +1000) links, for orienting the user, but it's not a big difference. –  Doin Feb 23 '13 at 7:00
    
Right, that's what I meant. Would be nice to set up some example paginators to test navigation of the same dataset under different circumstances. Might be the "right navigation" will partly a matter of taste. –  nik Mar 13 '13 at 12:52
    
„and also would introduce potentially confusing new UI elements“ well, I don't see a problem here. If the new UI element helps to solve a problem? It's our job as UI developers to create good tools to navigate the dataset. E.g. a slider could be a good solution too. May in combination with simple +/- buttons for the "fine tuning" :) –  nik Mar 13 '13 at 15:32

I think of two alternatives of logarithmic pagination:

  1. If relevant, you could split your data in sections, chapters and books. This is the old way, when paper was king, and libraries made the job of internet. Some PDF documents still have that.

  2. You can offer a search box, ala Wikipedia, if someone wants to jump to the part of big-data where supercalifragilisticexpialidocious is mentioned.

share|improve this answer
    
Both very true. However this question isn't really targetting situations where (1) applies; I was thinking more of retrieving records from a DB, or search results from a website, etc. (2) is almost always used in addition to some form of page navigation in these situations, rather than a replacement for it. (And obviously in such cases, a search box is indeed a highly desirable feature). –  Doin Jan 7 '13 at 10:44

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