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Is it possible to convert a non-nullable value type known only at runtime to nullable? In other words:

public Type GetNullableType(Type t)
{
    if (t.IsValueType)
    {
        return typeof(Nullable<t>);
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentException();
    }
}

Obviously the return line gives an error. Is there a way to do this? The Type.MakeGenericType method seems promising, but I have no idea how to get a unspecified generic Type object representing Nullable<T>. Any ideas?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

you want typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(t)

Note: Nullable<> without any supplied arguments is the unbound generic type; for more complex examples, you would add commas to suit - i.e. KeyValuePair<,>, Tuple<,,,> etc.

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Thanks! I searched the entire typeof() documentation and couldn't find anything about generics. –  jjoelson Oct 20 '11 at 13:23
2  
@jjoelson - note you should also check the underlying type, as you are not allowed to create Nullable<Nullable<int>> etc - consider: what if t == typeof(float?) (which has .ValueType === true ) –  Marc Gravell Oct 20 '11 at 13:24
    
Good point Marc. –  jjoelson Oct 20 '11 at 13:51
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You're on the right track. Try this:

if (t.IsValueType)
{
    return typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(t);
}
else
{
    throw new ArgumentException();
}
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Type GetNullableType(Type type) {
    // Use Nullable.GetUnderlyingType() to remove the Nullable<T> wrapper
    // if type is already nullable.
    type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
    if (type.IsValueType)
        return typeof(Nullable<>).MakeGenericType(type);
    else
        return type;
} 
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any chance you can format that correctly? indent the text 4 characters to get code recognition, etc –  Marc Gravell Oct 20 '11 at 13:22
1  
That doesn't actually do what we want here, since passing in typeof(int) will throw an exception (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) will return null) –  Marc Gravell Oct 20 '11 at 13:23
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