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I'm doing a feasibility study for storing data in the following structure with SQL Server 2008:

-MYTABLE

|ID|RECORDS|BRANCH_OFFICE|MONTH|YEAR

The RECORDS column has the XML data type and it will look like:

<visits>
  <visit id="000112233">
    <costumer>Mr. One Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-10</date>
    <employee>MAT01234</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112234">
    <costumer>Mr. Another Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-12</date>
    <employee>MAT01235</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112235">
    <costumer>Mr. Some Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-12</date>
    <employee>MAT01234</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112236">
    <costumer>Mr. Some Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-15</date>
    <employee>MAT01235</employee>
  </visit>
</visits>

I'm intending to query the xml column with xquery, is this a good way to store this data?

If I want to get the list of visits occurring in 2011-10, adding a tag with the difference of days between the "date" tag and now, how could it be?

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If it is XML, then yes, I would store it as XML .... –  marc_s Oct 20 '11 at 13:59
    
That looks like very structured, tabular data. Store it in an simple old-fashioned table. If you really need to store and query (semi-/unstructured) XML data, think about using a native XML Database. –  Jens Erat Oct 20 '11 at 14:07
    
yes i have to store it as XML, the RECORDS column will contain other kinds of structure as XML, and what about the xquery i asked for, some suggestion? And SQL SERVER 2008 is necessary. –  Julio Sampaio Oct 20 '11 at 14:11

1 Answer 1

A query against your XML could look something like this and I think your structure is just fine. There is no need to do any fancy XML stuff to get the information you need.

declare @T table
(
  ID int identity primary key,
  Records xml
)

insert into @T values('
<visits>
  <visit id="000112233">
    <costumer>Mr. One Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-10</date>
    <employee>MAT01234</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112234">
    <costumer>Mr. Another Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-12</date>
    <employee>MAT01235</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112235">
    <costumer>Mr. Some Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-12</date>
    <employee>MAT01234</employee>
  </visit>
  <visit id="000112236">
    <costumer>Mr. Some Costumer</costumer>
    <date>2011-02-15</date>
    <employee>MAT01235</employee>
  </visit>
</visits>')


select T.ID,
       V.X.value('@id', 'nvarchar(10)') as VisitID,
       V.X.value('costumer[1]', 'nvarchar(50)') as Costumer,
       V.X.value('date[1]', 'date') as [Date],
       V.X.value('employee[1]', 'nvarchar(50)') as Employee
from @T as T
  cross apply T.Records.nodes('/visits/visit') as V(X)

Result:

ID          VisitID    Costumer             Date       Employee
----------- ---------- -------------------- ---------- --------------------
1           000112233  Mr. One Costumer     2011-02-10 MAT01234
1           000112234  Mr. Another Costumer 2011-02-12 MAT01235
1           000112235  Mr. Some Costumer    2011-02-12 MAT01234
1           000112236  Mr. Some Costumer    2011-02-15 MAT01235
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