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I'd like to compare two arrays... ideally, efficiently. Nothing fancy, just true if they are identical, and false if not. Not surprisingly, the comparison operator doesn't seem to work.

var a1 = [1,2,3];
var a2 = [1,2,3];
console.log(a1==a2);    // Returns false
console.log(JSON.encode(a1)==JSON.encode(a2));    // Returns true

JSON encoding each array does, but is there a faster or "better" way to simply compare arrays without having to iterate through each value?

share|improve this question
3  
You could first compare their length, and if they are equal each values. –  TJHeuvel Oct 20 '11 at 14:29
7  
What makes two arrays equal for you? Same elements? Same order of elements? Encoding as JSON only works as long as the element of the array can be serialized to JSON. If the array can contain objects, how deep would you go? When are two objects "equal"? –  Felix Kling Oct 20 '11 at 14:31
1  
Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/27030/… –  RHT Oct 20 '11 at 14:33
    
@Blender - possibly, but the examples I did find on SO were only to specifically do something with the arrays, such as outputting all of the elements present in one but not the other, which would entail iterating through each element. Felix, in this case, same elements in the same order. –  Julian H. Lam Oct 20 '11 at 14:33
6  
@FelixKling, defining "equality" is definitely a subtle topic, but for people coming to JavaScript from higher-level languages, there is no excuse for silliness like ([] == []) == false. –  Alex D Mar 16 at 17:52

20 Answers 20

up vote 229 down vote accepted

I can't really believe that so many people want to compare arrays as strings. So, though this is old question, I will add the right way to compare arrays - loop through them and compare every value:

The right way:

// attach the .equals method to Array's prototype to call it on any array
Array.prototype.equals = function (array) {
    // if the other array is a falsy value, return
    if (!array)
        return false;

    // compare lengths - can save a lot of time 
    if (this.length != array.length)
        return false;

    for (var i = 0, l=this.length; i < l; i++) {
        // Check if we have nested arrays
        if (this[i] instanceof Array && array[i] instanceof Array) {
            // recurse into the nested arrays
            if (!this[i].equals(array[i]))
                return false;       
        }           
        else if (this[i] != array[i]) { 
            // Warning - two different object instances will never be equal: {x:20} != {x:20}
            return false;   
        }           
    }       
    return true;
}   

Usage:

[1, 2, [3, 4]].equals([1, 2, [3, 2]]) === false;
[1, "2,3"].equals([1, 2, 3]) === false;
[1, 2, [3, 4]].equals([1, 2, [3, 4]]) === true;
[1, 2, 1, 2].equals([1, 2, 1, 2]) === true;

You may say "But it is much faster to compare strings - no loops..." well, then you should note there ARE loops. First recursive loop that converts Array to string and second, that compares two strings. So this method is faster than use of string.

I believe that larger amounts of data should be always stored in arrays, not in objects. However if you use objects, they can be partially compared too.
Here's how:

Comparing objects:

I've stated above, that two object instances will never be equal, even if they contain same data at the moment:

({a:1, foo:"bar", numberOfTheBeast: 666}) == ({a:1, foo:"bar", numberOfTheBeast: 666})  //false

This has a reason, since there may be, for example private variables within objects.

However, if you just use object structure to contain data, comparing is still possible:

Object.prototype.equals = function(object2) {
    //For the first loop, we only check for types
    for (propName in this) {
        //Check for inherited methods and properties - like .equals itself
        //https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/hasOwnProperty
        //Return false if the return value is different
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(propName) != object2.hasOwnProperty(propName)) {
            return false;
        }
        //Check instance type
        else if (typeof this[propName] != typeof object2[propName]) {
            //Different types => not equal
            return false;
        }
    }
    //Now a deeper check using other objects property names
    for(propName in object2) {
        //We must check instances anyway, there may be a property that only exists in object2
            //I wonder, if remembering the checked values from the first loop would be faster or not 
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(propName) != object2.hasOwnProperty(propName)) {
            return false;
        }
        else if (typeof this[propName] != typeof object2[propName]) {
            return false;
        }
        //If the property is inherited, do not check any more (it must be equa if both objects inherit it)
        if(!this.hasOwnProperty(propName))
          continue;

        //Now the detail check and recursion

        //This returns the script back to the array comparing
        /**REQUIRES Array.equals**/
        if (this[propName] instanceof Array && object2[propName] instanceof Array) {
                   // recurse into the nested arrays
           if (!this[propName].equals(object2[propName]))
                        return false;
        }
        else if (this[propName] instanceof Object && object2[propName] instanceof Object) {
                   // recurse into another objects
                   //console.log("Recursing to compare ", this[propName],"with",object2[propName], " both named \""+propName+"\"");
           if (!this[propName].equals(object2[propName]))
                        return false;
        }
        //Normal value comparison for strings and numbers
        else if(this[propName] != object2[propName]) {
           return false;
        }
    }
    //If everything passed, let's say YES
    return true;
}  

However, remember that this one is to serve in comparing JSON like data, not class instances and other stuff. If you want to compare mor complicated objects, look at this answer and it's superlong function.
To make this work with Array.equals you must edit the original function a little bit:

...
    // Check if we have nested arrays
    if (this[i] instanceof Array && array[i] instanceof Array) {
        // recurse into the nested arrays
        if (!this[i].equals(array[i]))
            return false;
    }
    /**REQUIRES OBJECT COMPARE**/
    else if (this[i] instanceof Object && array[i] instanceof Object) {
        // recurse into another objects
        //console.log("Recursing to compare ", this[propName],"with",object2[propName], " both named \""+propName+"\"");
        if (!this[i].equals(array[i]))
            return false;
        }
    else if (this[i] != array[i]) {
...

I made a little test tool for both of the functions.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for your input. Given its view count, I suppose many users redirected here from Google are having the same conundrum of figuring out exactly how to compare two arrays "properly"! –  Julian H. Lam Feb 13 '13 at 16:05
7  
If you want to do strict comparisons use this[i] !== array[i] instead of !=. –  Tim S. May 15 '13 at 13:19
14  
Your method should be called equals instead of compare. At least in .NET, compare usually returns a signed int indicating which object is greater than the other. See: Comparer.Compare. –  Oliver May 31 '13 at 12:24
5  
+1 for the answer and a beer to your health for writing the function in the array prototype. –  Luca Fagioli Jun 7 '13 at 12:39
7  
Nt only is this the right way of doing it, it's also considerable more efficent. Here's a quick jsperf script I prepared for all the methods suggested in this question. jsperf.com/comparing-arrays2 –  Tolga E Oct 16 '13 at 19:30

It's unclear what you mean by "identical". For example, are the arrays a and b below identical (note the nested arrays)?

var a = ["foo", ["bar"]], b = ["foo", ["bar"]];

Here's an optimized array comparison function that compares corresponding elements of each array in turn using strict equality and does not do recursive comparison of array elements that are themselves arrays, meaning that for the above example, arraysIdentical(a, b) would return false. It works in the general case, which JSON- and join()-based solutions will not:

function arraysIdentical(a, b) {
    var i = a.length;
    if (i != b.length) return false;
    while (i--) {
        if (a[i] !== b[i]) return false;
    }
    return true;
};
share|improve this answer
    
This question is missing the inside array comparisons, right? –  Jadiel de Armas Aug 29 at 21:29
    
@ASDF: It's unclear from the question what "identical" means. Obviously this answer just does a shallow check. I'll add a note. –  Tim Down Sep 4 at 13:33

You could do a2.toString() == a1.toString().

This would result in something like:

var a1 = [1,2,3]
var a2 = [1,2,3]

var a1String = a1.toString() // "1,2,3"
var a2String = a2.toString() // "1,2,3"

a1String == a2String // true
share|improve this answer
24  
That's not a guarantee. ["1,2,3"].toString() === [1,2,3].toString(); //true ...but in specific cases it could work. –  user113716 Oct 20 '11 at 14:36
4  
I don't like it. It is not reliable (like @user113716 has proved) and it is slower than walking through the array using for. –  Tomáš Zato Feb 13 '13 at 16:21
3  
This is perfect if you are sure for example that both arrays contain only numbers –  lukas.pukenis Oct 8 '13 at 18:19

I like to use the underscore library for array/object heavy coding projects ... in underscore whether you're doing arrays or objects it just looks like this

_.isEqual(array1, array2); // or _.isEqual(object1, object2)

returns a boolean

See documentation

share|improve this answer
5  
Do this, and feel the lifeblood pumping back into your veins. I could sing a song on top of a mountain! Oh! I can compare arrays in one line of JS! Life is good. –  Aaron Gray Jul 3 at 17:09
1  
+1, stop reinventing the wheel –  Yves M. Aug 4 at 20:42
1  
If you're already using underscore/lodash, this is a no-brainer. If you're not already using underscore/lodash, you need to start. Now. Also? Use lodash instead of underscore ;) –  vbullinger Oct 21 at 18:14

Building off Tomáš Zato's answer, I agree that just iterating through the arrays is the fastest. Additionally (like others have already stated), the function should be called equals/equal, not compare. In light of this, I modified the function to handle comparing arrays for similarity - i.e. they have the same elements, but out of order - for personal use, and thought I'd throw it on here for everyone to see.

Array.prototype.equals = function (array, strict) {
    if (!array)
        return false;

    if (arguments.length == 1)
        strict = true;

    if (this.length != array.length)
        return false;

    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (this[i] instanceof Array && array[i] instanceof Array) {
            if (!this[i].equals(array[i], strict))
                return false;
        }
        else if (strict && this[i] != array[i]) {
            return false;
        }
        else if (!strict) {
            return this.sort().equals(array.sort(), true);
        }
    }
    return true;
}

This function takes an additional parameter of strict that defaults to true. This strict parameter defines if the arrays need to be wholly equal in both contents and the order of those contents, or simply just contain the same contents.

Example:

var arr1 = [1, 2, 3, 4];
var arr2 = [2, 1, 4, 3];  // Loosely equal to 1
var arr3 = [2, 2, 3, 4];  // Not equal to 1
var arr4 = [1, 2, 3, 4];  // Strictly equal to 1

arr1.equals(arr2);         // false
arr1.equals(arr2, false);  // true
arr1.equals(arr3);         // false
arr1.equals(arr3, false);  // false
arr1.equals(arr4);         // true
arr1.equals(arr4, false);  // true

I've also written up a quick jsfiddle with the function and this example:
http://jsfiddle.net/Roundaround/DLkxX/

share|improve this answer
2  
this is the best answer to this question –  Andre Figueiredo Nov 27 '13 at 18:47

while this only works for scalar arrays, it is short & sweet:

a1.length==a2.length && a1.every(function(v,i) { return v === a2[i]})

or, in typescript

a1.length==a2.length && a1.every((v,i)=> v === a2[i])
share|improve this answer
2  
I like this, although readers should be aware this only works on sorted arrays. –  espertus Dec 15 '13 at 15:05
    
Why doesn't this suggestion have more upvotes? Am I missing some crucial drawback (except that it's not working in IE < 9)? –  Peppe L-G Jan 19 at 12:59

On the same lines as JSON.encode is to use join().

function checkArrays( arrA, arrB ){

    //check if lengths are different
    if(arrA.length !== arrB.length) return false;


    //slice so we do not effect the original
    //sort makes sure they are in order
    //join makes it a string so we can do a string compare
    var cA = arrA.slice().sort().join(","); 
    var cB = arrB.slice().sort().join(",");

    return cA===cB;

}

var a = [1,2,3,4,5];
var b = [5,4,3,2,1];
var c = [1,2,3,4];
var d = [1,2,3,4,6];
var e = ["1","2","3","4","5"];  //will return true

console.log( checkArrays(a,b) );  //true
console.log( checkArrays(a,c) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,d) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,e) );  //true

Only problem is if you care about types which the last comparison tests. If you care about types, you will have to loop.

function checkArrays( arrA, arrB ){

    //check if lengths are different
    if(arrA.length !== arrB.length) return false;

    //slice so we do not effect the orginal
    //sort makes sure they are in order
    var cA = arrA.slice().sort(); 
    var cB = arrB.slice().sort();

    for(var i=0;i<cA.length;i++){
         if(cA[i]!==cB[i]) return false;
    }

    return true;

}

var a = [1,2,3,4,5];
var b = [5,4,3,2,1];
var c = [1,2,3,4];
var d = [1,2,3,4,6];
var e = ["1","2","3","4","5"];

console.log( checkArrays(a,b) );  //true
console.log( checkArrays(a,c) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,d) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,e) );  //false

If the order should remain the same, than it is just a loop, no sort is needed.

function checkArrays( arrA, arrB ){

    //check if lengths are different
    if(arrA.length !== arrB.length) return false;


    for(var i=0;i<arrA.length;i++){
         if(arrA[i]!==arrB[i]) return false;
    }

    return true;

}

var a = [1,2,3,4,5];
var b = [5,4,3,2,1];
var c = [1,2,3,4];
var d = [1,2,3,4,6];
var e = ["1","2","3","4","5"];

console.log( checkArrays(a,a) );  //true
console.log( checkArrays(a,b) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,c) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,d) );  //false
console.log( checkArrays(a,e) );  //false
share|improve this answer
1  
This only does work for certain arrays, and will be very slow with big arrays. –  Tomáš Zato Mar 21 '13 at 21:01
1  
Generating JSON is looping too, you just (or it seems so) don't know about it. Besides looping, generating JSON also requires more memory - it creates 2 string representations of said arrays before comparing. The downwote function is implemented to order answers from the best to the worst. I think your answer is not a good answer, so I downvoted it. –  Tomáš Zato Mar 21 '13 at 22:08
1  
Sorry, I just said JSON instead of .join(). Maybe if you stated your second solution as primary (as it is the better one, though toothless against multidimensional arrays), I would not judge you that way. So far, I downoted all answers that do convert arrays to strings. As well, I upvoted all that use the right way, in case you needed that to know. This means @Tim Down's answer and Bireys one. –  Tomáš Zato Mar 21 '13 at 23:01
1  
First version FAILS: checkArrays([1,2,3] , ["1,2",3]) == true, and it's very unlikely that that's what you want to happen! –  Doin Oct 16 at 3:46
1  
@epascarello: Yes, you can but (aside from the inefficiency of the very long separator you suggest) it means there will be edge cases (where the array happens to contain a string with your separator in it) where the checkArrays() function misbehaves. This might not be a problem if you know something about the contents of the arrays (so you can choose a separator you're sure won't be in the array items), but if you're trying to write a general array-comparison function, then using join() like this makes it subtly buggy! –  Doin Oct 17 at 13:49

Herer's my solution:

/**
 * Tests two data structures for equality
 * @param {object} x
 * @param {object} y
 * @returns {boolean}
 */
var equal = function(x, y) {
    if (typeof x !== typeof y) return false;
    if (x instanceof Array && y instanceof Array && x.length !== y.length) return false;
    if (typeof x === 'object') {
        for (var p in x) if (x.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
            if (typeof x[p] === 'function' && typeof y[p] === 'function') continue;
            if (x[p] instanceof Array && y[p] instanceof Array && x[p].length !== y[p].length) return false;
            if (typeof x[p] !== typeof y[p]) return false;
            if (typeof x[p] === 'object' && typeof y[p] === 'object') { if (!equal(x[p], y[p])) return false; } else
            if (x[p] !== y[p]) return false;
        }
    } else return x === y;
    return true;
};

Works with any nested data structure, and obviously ignores objects' methods. Don't even think of extending Object.prototype with this method, when I tried this once, jQuery broke ;)

For most arrays it's still faster than most of serialization solutions. It's probably the fastest compare method for arrays of object records.

share|improve this answer

Here's a CoffeeScript version, for those who prefer that:

Array.prototype.equals = (array) ->
  return false if not array # if the other array is a falsy value, return
  return false if @length isnt array.length # compare lengths - can save a lot of time

  for item, index in @
    if item instanceof Array and array[index] instanceof Array # Check if we have nested arrays
      if not item.equals(array[index]) # recurse into the nested arrays
        return false
    else if this[index] != array[index]
      return false # Warning - two different object instances will never be equal: {x:20} != {x:20}
  true

All credits goes to @tomas-zato.

share|improve this answer
1  
The [i]'s should be [index]. Otherwise, this works perfectly, thanks. –  smets.kevin Apr 29 at 20:32
    
@smets.kevin Good catch! I've updated the answer. –  Martin Apr 30 at 10:17

In my case compared arrays contain only numbers and strings. This solution worked for me:

function are_arrs_equal(arr1, arr2){
    return arr1.sort().toString() === arr2.sort().toString()
}

Let's test it!

arr1 = [1, 2, 3, 'nik']
arr2 = ['nik', 3, 1, 2]
arr3 = [1, 2, 5]

console.log (are_arrs_equal(arr1, arr2)) //true
console.log (are_arrs_equal(arr1, arr3)) //false
share|improve this answer

Extending Tomáš Zato idea. Tomas's Array.prototype.compare should be infact called Array.prototype.compareIdentical.

It passes on:

[1, 2, [3, 4]].compareIdentical ([1, 2, [3, 2]]) === false;
[1, "2,3"].compareIdentical ([1, 2, 3]) === false;
[1, 2, [3, 4]].compareIdentical ([1, 2, [3, 4]]) === true;
[1, 2, 1, 2].compareIdentical ([1, 2, 1, 2]) === true;

But fails on:

[[1, 2, [3, 2]],1, 2, [3, 2]].compareIdentical([1, 2, [3, 2],[1, 2, [3, 2]]])

Here is better (in my opinion) version:

Array.prototype.compare = function (array) {
    // if the other array is a falsy value, return
    if (!array)
        return false;

    // compare lengths - can save a lot of time
    if (this.length != array.length)
        return false;

    this.sort();
    array.sort();
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        // Check if we have nested arrays
        if (this[i] instanceof Array && array[i] instanceof Array) {
            // recurse into the nested arrays
            if (!this[i].compare(array[i]))
                return false;
        }
        else if (this[i] != array[i]) {
            // Warning - two different object instances will never be equal: {x:20} != {x:20}
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/igos/bcfCY/

share|improve this answer
2  
-1. If it 'fails' on the example you've given, then that's only the case for a somewhat arbitrary definition of 'fails'. Why would you expect those two different arrays to be considered equal? You haven't even explained what concept of 'equality' you're trying to implement here, or why it's a sensible or helpful one, but it looks like you want multidimensional arrays to be compared as if they were collapsed down to single-dimensional ones. If so, you didn't even achieve that: [1,2].compare([[1,2]]) gives false with your version, just as with Tomáš's. –  Mark Amery Jun 8 '13 at 13:57
    
Based on what I could infer, he's saying that [1, 2, 3, 4] and [1, 3, 2, 4] should be compared as equal (Order doesn't matter). –  Gautham Badhrinathan Jul 3 '13 at 8:50
    
I agree that both versions satisfy different definitions of 'equal' but I don't think it should be -1 so +1 from me –  OrganicPanda Jul 26 '13 at 8:47

for single dimension array you can simply use:

arr1.sort().toString() == arr2.sort().toString()

this will also take care of array with mismatched index.

share|improve this answer

This I think is the simplest way to do it using JSON stringify:

JSON.stringify(a1) == JSON.stringify(a2)

This turns the object into a string and it can be compared easily as a string, of course order is important but you can use the sort like one of the above answers if order is not important.

share|improve this answer

JSON.encode would also iterate through each value anyway so i guess it would be better to compare iterating through each value and reduce some steps of execution ( like encoding it into JSON )

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that is a good point. Were I using PHP, I'd elect to use md5();. –  Julian H. Lam Oct 20 '11 at 14:37
    
In JavaScript JSON has only parse() and stringify() methods. Check it yourself: console.dir(JSON). –  Pavlo Dec 9 '13 at 15:18
    
thank you for being so precise. parse() is what i meant. It is a logical answer and not code. That is why it is in text and not in the code. –  Birey Jan 7 at 20:34

My solution compares Objects, not Arrays. This would work in the same way as Tomáš's as Arrays are Objects, but without the Warning:

Object.prototype.compare_to = function(comparable){

    // Is the value being compared an object
    if(comparable instanceof Object){

        // Count the amount of properties in @comparable
        var count_of_comparable = 0;
        for(p in comparable) count_of_comparable++;

        // Loop through all the properties in @this
        for(property in this){

            // Decrements once for every property in @this
            count_of_comparable--;

            // Prevents an infinite loop
            if(property != "compare_to"){

                // Is the property in @comparable
                if(property in comparable){

                    // Is the property also an Object
                    if(this[property] instanceof Object){

                        // Compare the properties if yes
                        if(!(this[property].compare_to(comparable[property]))){

                            // Return false if the Object properties don't match
                            return false;
                        }
                    // Are the values unequal
                    } else if(this[property] !== comparable[property]){

                        // Return false if they are unequal
                        return false;
                    }
                } else {

                    // Return false if the property is not in the object being compared
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
    } else {

        // Return false if the value is anything other than an object
        return false;
    }

    // Return true if their are as many properties in the comparable object as @this
    return count_of_comparable == 0;
}

Hope this helps you or anyone else searching for an answer.

share|improve this answer
function compareArrays(arrayA, arrayB) {
    if (arrayA.length != arrayB.length) return true;
    for (i = 0; i < arrayA.length; i++)
        if (arrayB.indexOf(arrayA[i]) == -1) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    for (i = 0; i < arrayB.length; i++) {
        if (arrayA.indexOf(arrayB[i]) == -1) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

If the array is plain and the order is matter so this two lines may help

//Assume
var a = ['a','b', 'c']; var b = ['a','e', 'c'];  

if(a.length !== b.length) return false;
return !a.reduce(
  function(prev,next,idx, arr){ return prev || next != b[idx] },false
); 

Reduce walks through one of array and returns 'false' if at least one element of 'a' is nor equial to element of 'b' Just wrap this into function

share|improve this answer

Maybe it is a good idea to employ functional programming techniques that JavaScript provides for its users. Consider the following code:

var a = ['h','e','l','l','o'];
var b = ['h','e','l','l','r'];

function compare_arrays(a1,a2) {
    var i=0;
    return a1.every(function(e){
        return e==a2[i++];
    });
}

compare_arrays(a,b); // produces false
share|improve this answer
    
From the docs: "callback is invoked with three arguments: the value of the element, the index of the element, and the Array object being traversed." So you don't need mutable i here. –  Tvaroh May 28 at 7:30

While == is comparing pointers for array, it is often forgoten that < and > work pretty good. So one simple solution is:

  function eq(a,b){return !(a<b || b<a);}

It appears to work quite good, but it seems to be a bit lose about type-checking:

eq([1,2],[])
false
eq([1,2],[1,2,0])
false
eq([1,2,0],[1,2,0])
true
eq([1,2,0],[1,2,null])
false
eq([1,2,0],[1,2,"0"])
true
eq([1,2,0],[1,2,[0]])
true
eq([1,2,[0],[3]],[1,2,[0,3]])
true
eq([1,2,[0],[3]],[1,2,[0,4]])
false
eq([1,2,[0],[3]],[1,2,"0,3"])
true

So, as long as your arrays contain only numbers it should work just fine, and is definitely nice short hack:)

share|improve this answer

I use this code with no issues so far:

if(a.join() == b.join())
    ...

It works even if there are commas in an item.

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