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I have a configuration file that looks like the example below. There are a series of definitions grouped by hostname. I just added the "cpu-service" definition to one host "mothership". Now I need to do this to 100+ more in the same file. What I have already done is scraped from config file all pre-existing host names (100+). So now I have a file with the list of servers that now need to have the cpu-service define comment. They already have ping-service so I just want to add the cpu-service to each one. Obviously manually doing this by hand would be tedious.

Is there a sed/awk script I could use to do this type of work. Basically I need to maybe write a skel file with the define part and leave host_name blank. Then feed the host.txt file into that. I could maybe hack this with some VI trickery as well. Not sure?

Thanks in advance!

 
define{
        use                             cpu-service
        host_name                       mothership
        contact_groups                  systems manager
}
define{
        use                             ping-service
        host_name                       mothership
        contact_groups                  systems manager
}
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3 Answers 3

Although I got the slight feeling to do your work, try the script below:

 awk '
 BEGIN {
         RS = ORS = "}\n"
         FS = "\n"
 }
 NF > 0 {
         print
         if (sub(/ping-service/, "cpu-service")) print
 }
 ' file

One tradeoff: Somehow I get a trailing "}" but it is not worth worrying about, unless you got to make that every day - just remove it with an editor.

As always with awk: If your vendor ships an historic version of awk you may want to use nawk.

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Three steps mister:

1: Host name file (hostnames.txt)

mothership
motherload
motherofpeal
mothersbaugh

2: script (hostup.sh)

#!/bin/bash

HOSTNAME=$1

TEMPLATE=" 
define{
        use                             cpu-service
        host_name                       ${HOSTNAME}
        contact_groups                  systems manager
}
define{
        use                             ping-service
        host_name                       ${HOSTNAME}
        contact_groups                  systems manager
}"

echo "${TEMPLATE}"

3: command line

chmod +x hostup.sh
while read name; do hostup.sh $name; done < hostnames.txt
while read name; do hostup.sh $name; done < hostnames.txt >> hosts.conf

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Thanks mmrtnt. works almost to the point I need it. However, I already have motherload, motherofpeal, mothersbaugh with the ping-service defined. So really I need to insert cpu-service ontop of those already existing definitions. This is really close. –  Zack Lee Oct 20 '11 at 15:59

Sed can insert newlines, just backslash escape them - e.g. the following will go through each line in your 'hosts' file, and replace it with a full definition for the cpu-service. I'm not sure if this is exactly what you want.

sed -e 's/^(.*)$/define{\
    use                             cpu-service\
    host_name                       \1\
    contact_groups                  systems manager\
}/g' hosts.txt > new_directives

if you're happy with new_directives then you can just

cat new_directives >> config_file

NOTE you may get issues with blank/trailing newlines.

share|improve this answer
    
Where would I reference the host.txt file I have? Is -i .bak - myconfig.cfg.bak? –  Zack Lee Oct 20 '11 at 14:52
    
Also maybe I was not clear. The define cpu service is not there for anything but "mothership" The other 100+ servers only have ping-service defined. So this wouldn't work? –  Zack Lee Oct 20 '11 at 14:57
    
@ZackLee the updated answer may be closer to what you're after? –  Benjie Oct 20 '11 at 15:13

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