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I want to perform my own complex operations on financial data in dataframes in a sequential manner.

For example I am using the following MSFT CSV file taken from Yahoo Finance:

Date,Open,High,Low,Close,Volume,Adj Close

2011-10-19,27.37,27.47,27.01,27.13,42880000,27.13

2011-10-18,26.94,27.40,26.80,27.31,52487900,27.31

2011-10-17,27.11,27.42,26.85,26.98,39433400,26.98

2011-10-14,27.31,27.50,27.02,27.27,50947700,27.27

....

I then do the following:

#!/usr/bin/env python
from pandas import *

df = read_csv('table.csv')

for i, row in enumerate(df.values):
    date = df.index[i]
    open, high, low, close, adjclose = row
    #now perform analysis on open/close based on date, etc..

Is that the most efficient way? Given the focus on speed in pandas, I would assume there must be some special function to iterate through the values in a manner that one also retrieves the index (possibly through a generator to be memory efficient)? df.iteritems unfortunately only iterates column by column.

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1  
Has speed become an issue, or do you just want it to be as fast as possible? –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 20 '11 at 15:13
3  
Just want it to be as fast as possible. i.e. best practice –  Muppet Oct 20 '11 at 15:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Pandas is based on NumPy arrays. The key to speed with NumPy arrays is to perform your operations on the whole array at once, never row-by-row or item-by-item.

For example, if close is a 1-d array, and you want the day-over-day percent change,

pct_change = close[1:]/close[:-1]

This computes the entire array of percent changes as one statement, instead of

pct_change = []
for row in close:
    pct_change.append(...)

So try to avoid the Python loop for i, row in enumerate(...) entirely, and think about how to perform your calculations with operations on the entire array (or dataframe) as a whole, rather than row-by-row.

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4  
I agree that this is the best way and that is what I usually do for simple operations. However, in this case, this is not possible, since the resulting operations can get very complex. Specifically I am trying to backtest trading strategies. E.g. if the price is at a new low over a 30d period, then we might want to buy the stock and get out whenever a certain condition is met and this needs to be simulated in-place. This simple example could still be done by vectorization, however, the more complex a trading-strategy gets, the less possible it becomes to use vectorization. –  Muppet Oct 20 '11 at 15:16
    
You'll have to explain in more detail the exact calculation you are trying to perform. It helps to write the code any way you can first, then profile and optimize it. –  unutbu Oct 20 '11 at 15:19
4  
By the way, for some calculations (especially those that can not be expressed as operations on whole arrays) code using Python lists can be faster than equivalent code using numpy arrays. –  unutbu Oct 20 '11 at 15:35
    
makes sense. Will work with that. thank you! –  Muppet Oct 20 '11 at 20:57
5  
I agree vectorization is the right solution where possible-- sometimes an iterative algorithm is the only way though. –  Wes McKinney Oct 21 '11 at 16:15

You can loop through the rows by transposing and then calling iteritems:

for date, row in df.T.iteritems():
   # do some logic here

I am not certain about efficiency in that case. To get the best possible performance in an iterative algorithm, you might want to explore writing it in Cython, so you could do something like:

def my_algo(ndarray[object] dates, ndarray[float64_t] open,
            ndarray[float64_t] low, ndarray[float64_t] high,
            ndarray[float64_t] close, ndarray[float64_t] volume):
    cdef:
        Py_ssize_t i, n
        float64_t foo
    n = len(dates)

    for i from 0 <= i < n:
        foo = close[i] - open[i] # will be extremely fast

I would recommend writing the algorithm in pure Python first, make sure it works and see how fast it is-- if it's not fast enough, convert things to Cython like this with minimal work to get something that's about as fast as hand-coded C/C++.

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4  
I also recommend Cython; I was working on a similar problem for building my backtesting engine, and I got a 1,000x speedup. I then combined that with the multiprocessing library, which is a very nice combination. –  vgoklani Oct 7 '12 at 12:31
1  
This answer needs updating to include the new df.iterrows() as per @NickCrawford's answer. –  LondonRob Jun 6 at 16:14

The newest versions of pandas now include a built-in function for iterating over rows.

for count, row in df.iterrows():

    # do some logic here

But, unutbu's suggestion to use numpy functions to avoid iterating over rows will produce the fastest code.

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I checked out iterrows after noticing Nick Crawford's answer, but found that it yields (index, Series) tuples. Not sure which would work best for you, but I ended up using the itertuples method for my problem, which yields (index, row_value1...) tuples.

There's also iterkv, which iterates through (column, series) tuples.

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you can do something like dict(row) to make a set out of the row with searchable columns –  Carst Oct 16 '13 at 22:36
1  
I also found itertuples to be much faster (10x) in my use case as Series objects are not being created. –  tuva Jun 11 at 12:51

Just as a small addition, you can also do an apply if you have a complex function that you apply to a single column:

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/generated/pandas.DataFrame.apply.html

df[b] = df[a].apply(lambda x: do stuff with x here)
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1  
probably x is a confusing name for the column name and the row variable, though I agree apply is easiest way to do it :) –  Andy Hayden Oct 17 '13 at 6:09
    
Good comment, I've edited it so that the "x" confusion has gone! –  Carst Oct 17 '13 at 9:53
1  
just to add, apply can also be applied to multiple columns: df['c'] = df[['a','b']].apply(lambda x: do stuff with x[0] and x[1] here, axis=1) –  fantabolous Aug 16 at 13:18

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