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what exactly does FB.Arbiter object inside the "connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js"?

is it something for communication between iframes? there is a inform function inside FB.Arbiter which creates an invisible iframe inside iframe app.

this is the source of inform function:

function (d, f, g, c, a) 
{
    if (FB.Canvas.isTabIframe() || FB._inPlugin && window.postMessage || !FB._inCanvas && FB.UA.mobile() && window.postMessage) 
    {
        var e = FB.JSON.stringify({
            method : d, params : f, behavior : a || FB.Arbiter.BEHAVIOR_PERSISTENT
        });
        if (window.postMessage) {
            FB.XD.resolveRelation(g || "parent").postMessage(e, "*");
            return;
        }
        else {
            try {
                window.opener.postMessage(e);
                return;
            }
            catch (b) { }
        }
    }
    var i = FB.getDomain((c ? "https_" : "") + "staticfb") + FB.Arbiter._canvasProxyUrl + "#" + FB.QS.encode(
    {
        method : d, params : FB.JSON.stringify(f || {}), behavior : a || FB.Arbiter.BEHAVIOR_PERSISTENT, 
        relation : g
    });
    var h = FB.Content.appendHidden("");
    FB.Content.insertIframe(
    {
        url : i, root : h, width : 1, height : 1,
        onload : function () 
        {
            setTimeout(function () 
            {
                h.parentNode.removeChild(h);
            }, 10);
        }
    });
}

can someone explain this function?

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1 Answer 1

Facebook has a class called Arbiter that manages events. It's basically Facebook's own event system. You can bind a function to an event using Arbiter.subscribe("id/id",function_name). "id/id" is just a string that identifies a custom name for an event. When you call Arbiter.inform("id/id",{data:"in an object"}), any functions that were subscribed using the same "id/id", such as function_name(), are called, and {data:"in an object"} is passed to it as the second argument. (The first argument is just "id/id".)

In other words, Arbiter.inform() triggers events in Facebook's event system.

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