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I can not understand my mistake in this code, it will compile if I write new Cosine(); but fails if I write new Cosine(x);

import java.lang.Object;
import java.lang.Math;

class Cosine {
    double Cosine (double x) {
    double result = Math.cos(Math.toRadians(x));
    return result;
  }
}

public class test {
     public static void main (String[] args){
     double x = 90;
     new Cosine(x);
  }
}   
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1  
You have a very strange structure here. It's not normal to create a Cosine class to store the results of a cosine calculation, unless you are somehow wanting to create classes for different kinds of operations. If that's the case all the different ones should have the same calling mechanism: e.g. a 'calculate' method that returns a double, that is implemented differently for Sine, Cosine and Tangent classes. –  DJClayworth Oct 20 '11 at 16:10
1  
Do you know what is constructor? –  Aniket Kulkarni Nov 27 '12 at 10:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You haven't given Cosine a constructor that takes a double. Try this:

class Cosine {

    public final double result; //field holding the result

    //constructor
    public Cosine (double x){
     result = Math.cos(Math.toRadians(x)); //compute the result
   }
}

public class test {
    public static void main (String[] args){
        double x = 90;
        double cosX = new Cosine(x).result;
    }
}

Although this raises the question why a simple static method couldn't be used:

public static double getCosine(double x) {
    return Math.cos(Math.toRadians(x));
}

public class test {
    public static void main (String[] args){
        double x = 90;
        double cosX = getCosine(x);
    }
}

This doesn't require the instantiation of a Cosine object for every computation.

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That is because you have not declared a constructor that takes in a double. You can declare new Cosine() because there is the implicit no arg constructor. But in order to pass in a double you would have to explicitly create one.

public Cosine(double x){
  ...
}

However, if you just want to run the method that you have written to get the cosine you can declare a Cosine object then reference the method.

Cosine cos=new Cosine();
cos.cosine(4.2);
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double Cosine (double x){

should be

Cosine (double x){

because constructors don't have a return value.

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a java constructor would be

public Cosine(double x){
 ...
}
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double Cosine(double x) is not a constructor. It's a method. Constructors don't have return types.

So use Cosine(double x) instead.

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You don't have any constructor taking double as parameter

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You haven't created a constructor for Cosine -- so the compiler is supplying a default, no-args constructor.

This

double Cosine (double x){
double result = Math.cos(Math.toRadians(x));
return result;
  }

is being parsed as a method declaration (I think).

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double Cosine (double x) {
double result = Math.cos(Math.toRadians(x));
return result;
}

This is not constructor. This is method declaration.
Here

double Cosine(double x){}

is method declaration.
There are some rules for defining a constructor as follows:
1.It has the same name as the class in which it resides and is syntactically similar to a method.
2.They have no return type, not even void.
3.The constructor is automatically called immediately after the object is created, before the new operator completes.

As in the above question method

Cousine(double x)

has return type double, it breaks the 2nd rule.

I ran the code on my machine resulted in an error:

test.java:14: cannot find symbol
symbol : constructor Cosine(double)
location: class Cosine
new Cosine(x);
^
1 error

It means that there is no parametrized constructor defined in program.

Update
Add constructor

Cosine(double x){
   ....
   .....
}
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