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My problem is that I only want Header 1 and Header 2 to call the click function. If i click on List item 1.1 etc I want nothing to happen. As it is now, clicking on any list item will call the event.

Javascript

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("ul#nav li ul").hide(); 
    $("ul#nav li").click(function() {
        $("ul#nav li").removeClass("current"); 
        $(this).addClass("current"); 
        $("ul#nav li ul").slideUp('fast'); 
        $(this).find("ul").slideDown('fast');
    });
});

HTML

    <ul id="nav">  
        <li><a href="#">Header 1</a>
        <ul>
           <li>List item 1.1</li>
           <li>List item 1.2</li>
           <li>List item 1.3</li>
        </ul>
        </li>
       <li><a href="#">Header 2</a>
       <ul>
           <li>List item 2.1</li>
           <li>List item 2.2</li>
           <li>List item 2.3</li>
       </ul>
       </li>
    </ul>

I have looked through a couple of similar questions and answers but they did not quite help me to solve the problem.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's how I would do it:

$( nav ).delegate( 'li', 'click', function () {   
    if ( !$( this ).parent().is( nav ) ) { return false; }  
    $( this ).siblings( '.' + clss ).removeClass( clss ).children( 'ul' ).slideUp( 'fast' );
    $( this ).addClass( clss ).children( 'ul' ).slideDown( 'fast' )
});

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/WsZdJ/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Worked even better. Thanks! –  estrar Oct 20 '11 at 17:47
    
Ok, i see the point +1. Although if they click on an already open one it should slide it up, i would think. –  aziz punjani Oct 20 '11 at 18:19
    
@Interstellar_Coder No, because $( this ).siblings( '.' + clss ) cannot select the clicked LI element. The slideUp executes only if one of the siblings of the clicked LI have the class set. –  Šime Vidas Oct 20 '11 at 18:24

Use the > to get only the child li's and not all decedent li's.

<ul id="nav">  
    <li><a href="#">Header 1</a></li>
    <ul>
       <li>List item 1.1</li>
       <li>List item 1.2</li>
       <li>List item 1.3</li>
    </ul>

   <li><a href="#">Header 2</a></li>
   <ul>
       <li>List item 2.1</li>
       <li>List item 2.2</li>
       <li>List item 2.3</li>
   </ul>

</ul>


$(document).ready(function() {
    $("ul#nav ul").hide(); 

    $("ul#nav > li").click(function(e) {
        if( $(this).hasClass('current') )
        {
          $(this).removeClass("current"); 
          $("ul#nav ul").slideUp('fast');
        }
        else 
        {  
          $('.current').removeClass('.current');             
          $(this).addClass("current");         
          $(this).next().slideDown('fast');
        }
        e.preventDefault(); 
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
Event delegation would be better... –  Šime Vidas Oct 20 '11 at 16:20
    
Event delegation is more code. Why would it be better ? –  aziz punjani Oct 20 '11 at 16:21
    
This won't work - even though the code will select only the top most <li>s as the other <li>s are inside the top level <li>s clicking on them will still fire the click event. See - jsfiddle.net/WsZdJ –  ipr101 Oct 20 '11 at 16:26
    
@ipr101 That's because the outer LI contains the inner LI's. An event.target check is required here... –  Šime Vidas Oct 20 '11 at 16:28
    
Could I get an example? I tried the first given answer and as someone stated it didn't work. –  estrar Oct 20 '11 at 16:30

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