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I have a table that stores the hierarchy of workgroups in our organization. It looks something like:

CREATE TABLE WORKGROUPS  ( 
    WORKGROUPID         NUMBER NULL,
    NAME                VARCHAR2(100) NOT NULL,
    PARENTWORKGROUPID   NUMBER NOT NULL,
    WORKGROUPLEVEL      CHAR(1) DEFAULT 1 NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT WORKGROUPS_PK PRIMARY KEY(WORKGROUPID)
)

For example, there might be three levels of workgroups deep:

ID 1 - Sales (PARENTWORKGROUPID = 0)
ID 2 - Business Sales (PARENTWORKGROUPID = 1)
ID 3 - West Coast B2B (PARENTWORKGROUPID = 2)

So 3's parent is 2, 2's parent is 1, and 1 is a top level workgroup with no parent, so we use 0.

Now we have a TASKS table. Each TASKS row has a WORKGROUPID column that points to a WORKGROUPID in the WORKGROUPS table.

I need to write a query that returns all TASKS that are under a given top-level workgroup, such as everything under Sales (which, in the example above, could be WORKGROUPIDs 1, 2 or 3. Basically, it's a recursive query.

I can think of some ways to do this using a LEFT JOIN for to check each level, but I'd rather stay away from solutions that hard-code in the number of levels since the database is designed to allow any number of tiers. Any other solution I can think of involves changing the table schema, which I can't do at the moment. Any ideas? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Oracle seems to have its own version of recursion (I use SQL Server and DB2, which use Common Table Expressions to power recursion), but I think this should possibly get what you want:

WITH WGS (
    WORKGROUPID,
    NAME
) AS (
    SELECT WORKGROUPID,
        NAME
    FROM WORKGROUPS
    START WITH WORKGROUPID = :top-lev-dept
    CONNECT BY WORKGROUPID = PRIOR PARENTWORKGROUPID
)

SELECT DISTINCT T.*
FROM TASKS
INNER JOIN WGS W
    ON (T.WORKGROUPID = W.WORKGROUPID)

You'd obviously change :top-lev-dept to the department you're searching for.

If that's not it, you might check out the Oracle reference page on Hierarchical Queries. That might get you started in the right direction...

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Awesome, yea it looks like this "connect by" is the key.. I will do more research on that topic and go from there - thanks for the pointer! –  Mike Christensen Oct 20 '11 at 17:10
    
This basically ended up being almost exactly what I did. I tried to use CONNECT_BY_ROOT but it didn't seem to work with the way I was joining stuff in. So I used the CTE instead, and updated my view to return the "root" workgroup for all the rows. Now, I can just select from that view and query for specific root workgroups, easy and pie. –  Mike Christensen Oct 20 '11 at 17:54

Starting with Oracle 11gR2, the ANSI recursive WITH syntax is supported, and is an alternative to START WITH/CONNECT BY:

WITH wgs ( workgroupid, name ) AS
(
    SELECT workgroupid, name FROM workgroups WHERE workgroupid = :top-lev-dept
     UNION ALL
    SELECT w.workgroupid, w.name FROM workgroups w, wgs WHERE parentworkgroupid = wgs.workgroupid
)
SELECT ...

The key here is:

WITH view (column_definition) AS
(
    SELECT root rows
     UNION ALL
    SELECT sub rows FROM table JOIN view ON recursion condition
)
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Thanks - I decided to go with the START WITH/CONNECT BY method with a CTE, mainly to learn something new and also it required minimal changes to the view I was getting this data from. –  Mike Christensen Oct 20 '11 at 17:56

You'll want to investigate the START WITH/CONNECT BY syntax.

Something like:

select * from workgroups
start with parentworkgroupid = 0
connect by prior workgroupid = parentworkgroupid;

Totally untested, but I think it will get you started.

Hope that helps.

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Excellent, I think this at least gets me heading in the right direction. Thanks! –  Mike Christensen Oct 20 '11 at 17:10

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