Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do you represent an OR-relation in a Bayesian Network? For example, P(A | B OR C).

I also wonder how you can calculate the probability for such an expression?

Thank you in advance!

share|improve this question
    
are you taking Stanford's ai-class? :-) –  Pablo Santa Cruz Oct 20 '11 at 17:38
    
No, I am studying in Sweden :) –  haersk Oct 20 '11 at 17:46
add comment

1 Answer

This is not particularly well-posed, because one cannot sum over the conditioned variables in a conditional distribution. However, an example may help. If we assume that B and C are binary variables and introduce a variable Z = A or B. Let's define the following joint distribution on P(A,B,C)

A B C | Z | P(A,B,C) 
------+---+----------
0 0 0 | 0 |   0.02   
0 0 1 | 1 |   0.22   
0 1 0 | 1 |   0.06   
0 1 1 | 1 |   0.08   
1 0 0 | 0 |   0.18   
1 0 1 | 1 |   0.24   
1 1 0 | 1 |   0.17  
1 1 1 | 1 |   0.03  

Now, by the definition of a conditional distribution, P(A|Z) = P(A,Z)/P(Z). So, summing up terms

P(Z = 0) = 0.02 + 0.18 = 0.20
P(Z = 1) = 0.22 + 0.06 + 0.08 + 0.24 + 0.17 + 0.03 = 0.80

and P(A,Z)

   A | Z | P(A, Z) | P(A | Z)
   --+---+---------+---------
   0 | 0 | 0.02    | 0.10
   1 | 0 | 0.18    | 0.90

   0 | 1 | 0.36    | 0.45
   1 | 1 | 0.44    | 0.55

Notice that once we condition on Z that the two sets of terms with Z held constant both sum to 1.0.

So, in short, there isn't a generic way of calculating P(A|B or C), you need to look at the joint distribution in order to calculate the appropriate probabilities.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.