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In lieu of full-text search on GAE I'm using the solution below to return a resultset that's sorted, first by keyword relevance, and secondly by date (though the second sorting could be anything really). It feels a bit bulky and I'm concerned about performance at scale so I'm looking for optimization suggestions or a different approach altogether.

The secondary sorting is important to my use case, since a given search will likely have multple results of the same relevance (as measured by the number of keyword matches), but preserving the original query ordering adds a lot of complexity right now. Any ideas?

Step 1: Get a list of keys that match each search term

results_key_list = []
search_terms = ['a','b','c'] #User's search query, split into a list of strings

#query each search term and add the results to a list
#yields a list of keys with frequency of occurance indicating relevance     
for item in search_terms:
    subquery = SomeEntity.all(keys_only=True)                   
    subquery.filter('SearchIndex = ', item) #SearchIndex is a StringListProperty
    #more filters...            
    subquery.order('-DateCreated')                  
    for returned_item in subquery:
        results_key_list.append(str(returned_item))     

Step 2: Group the list by frequency while maintaining the original order

#return a dictionary of keys, with their frequency of occurrence            
grouped_results = defaultdict(int)              
for key in results_key_list:
    grouped_results[key] += 1               

sorted_results = []
known = set()

#creates an empty list for each match frequency 
for i in range(len(search_terms)):
    sorted_results.append([])

#using the original results ordering, 
#construct an array of results grouped and ordered by descending frequency  
for key in results_key_list:
    if key in known: continue
    frequency = grouped_results[key]
    sorted_results[len(search_terms) - frequency].append(key)
    known.add(key)          

#combine into a single list
ordered_key_list = []   
for l in sorted_results:
    ordered_key_list.extend(l)  

del ordered_key_list[:offset]
del ordered_key_list[limit:]    
result = SomeEntity.get(ordered_key_list)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
search_terms = ['a','b','c'] #User's search query, split into a list of strings

You can accumulate the keys in the order of appearance and can build-up the key frequencies in all in one pass. Take advantage of sort stability to make a sort by decreasing frequency, then by order of appearance:

keys_in_order_of_appearance = []
key_frequency = defaultdict(int)

for item in search_terms:
    subquery = SomeEntity.all(keys_only=True)                   
    subquery.filter('SearchIndex = ', item) #SearchIndex is a StringListProperty
    #more filters...            
    subquery.order('-DateCreated')                  
    for returned_item in subquery:
        key = str(returned_item)
        if key not in key_frequency:
            key_order_of_appearance.append(key)
        key_frequency[key] += 1

keys = keys_in_order_of_appearance[:]   # order of appearance kept as secondary sort
keys.sort(key=key_frequency.__getitem__, reverse=True) # descending freq as primary sort
result = SomeEntity.get(ordered_key_list)
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Thanks! This is exactly the sort of reduction I was looking for. –  Kevin P Oct 21 '11 at 17:02

In step 1, you're iterating over a query object. This results in one fetch RPC per 20 objects returned, which is inefficient, time-wise. Instead, call fetch(n) on the Query object, where n is the maximum number of results to return - this does only a single RPC. It also has the benefit of limiting the number of results to search - right now, if I search for 'I', your app will get stuck processing nearly every record in step 1.

It's also completely unnecessary to convert the keys into strings - you can add keys to a set just fine.

For what it's worth, though, I personally find 'or' searches to be particularly useless. I realise you'll rank items that match all the terms first, but those will inevitably be followed by piles and piles of irrelevant results. You could do an 'and' search simply by doing one query with an equality filter for each search term.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you comment. In my particular case the resultset is typically narrow (due to the other filters), so taking the 'OR' approach ensures that at least some results are returned and, in the absence of stemming, makes the search a little more forgiving. That said, you've made me realize I may be able to optimize by targeting a specific result count, ie looking for 'OR' matches only if there are less than N results. –  Kevin P Oct 25 '11 at 18:18
    
I switched to adsense search for my site still waiting for GAE to deliver a more complete search library. SearchableModel has too many limitations IMHO. –  909 Niklas Nov 5 '11 at 5:09

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