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Given a css file, is there a way to scope the entire file so that it only applies to elements within a given element:

e.g. given:

<div id="container">
   <span class="some_element"/>
   <!-- etc -->
</div>

Is there a way to scope an entire css file to apply to all elements within "container" without prepending #container to every single css clause?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

I’m afraid not. Some CSS pre-processors allow you to write code that achieves the same thing though.

E.g. LESS implements nested rules:

/* This LESS code... */

#header {
  h1 {
    font-size: 26px;
    font-weight: bold;
  }
  p { font-size: 12px;
    a { text-decoration: none;
      &:hover { border-width: 1px }
    }
  }
}

/* ...produces this CSS */

#header h1 {
  font-size: 26px;
  font-weight: bold;
}
#header p {
  font-size: 12px;
}
#header p a {
  text-decoration: none;
}
#header p a:hover {
  border-width: 1px;
}

And Andy mentioned SASS, which does the same thing.

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You can do this in-browser using LESS's demo. Just paste in your CSS and wrap it with your selector, e.g., #your-custom-scope-selector { /* CSS here */ }, click Compile, and you'll have your custom scoped CSS. Useful if you just need a one-time transformation and don't have LESS or SCSS on your machine. – Josh Aug 22 '14 at 21:23
    
Of course this kind of "scoping" is not going to work on rules applied to container elements outside your host element. I.e., if the source CSS file has body {font-family: Georgia;}, and you change it to #your-custom-scope-selector body {font-family: Georgia;}, that rule is going to stop working (assuming #your-custom-scope-selector is somewhere inside the body element; in the OP's scenario, this sounds like the case) – Josh Aug 22 '14 at 21:29

You can use the scoped attribute on a <style> element, although there's little to no browser support for it. In your example:

<div id="container">
    <style scoped>.some_element{}</style>
    <span class="some_element"></span>
</div>

Here's a jQuery Polyfill: http://thingsinjars.com/post/360/scoped-style/

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There are 2 ways you could approach this:

1) In HTML5, (not widely supported yet) there is to be a scoped attribute you can put on a <style> tag. Here is a brief article on the subject.

2) You could use a dynamic stylesheet language (like LESS or SASS) that allow you to nest related CSS rules together.

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#1 got my hopes up but NO, it is only in HTML5.1 draft, not in HTML5 spec, and only works on firefox currently so currenly #2 is the only way to go – pilavdzice Sep 30 '14 at 20:19

Not with CSS alone, but you can use Sass, which compiled into CSS.

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You could use BEM naming notation -- http://csswizardry.com/2013/01/mindbemding-getting-your-head-round-bem-syntax/ ("block, element, modifier").

Your example would become:

<div id="container">
   <span class="container__some_element"/>
   <!-- etc -->
</div>

Yes, if you don't use an abbreviation, you're writing the same number of characters in your CSS... but your styles will have less specificity -- which can be beneficial.

Hopefully browser support for <style scoped> will get better in the coming years!

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You could load the page in with php and throw whatever tag you want in dynamically, or do the same with javascript/jQuery... although that's fairly clumsy. There's no built in method to do this as CSS is always applied to the entire page.

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