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I would like a method in a base class to call another method in the same class instead of the overriding method in an inherited class. I would like the following code to print out

Class B: 6

Class A: 9

Can this be done?


# Base class definition
class ClassA(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Initializing A")

    # hoping that this function is called by this class's printFnX
    def fnX(self, x):
        return x**2

    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassA:",self.fnX(x))

# Inherits from ClassA above
class ClassB(ClassA):
    def __init__(self):
        print("initizlizing B")

    def fnX(self, x):
        return 2*x

    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassB:", self.fnX(x))
        ClassA.printFnX(self,x)

bx = ClassB()
bx.printFnX(3)
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7  
Do you care to reconsider which answer you've marked as accepted? the current selection is really bad advice for most people and most use cases. –  Raymond Hettinger Jan 13 '12 at 7:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The same can be achieved by making fnX and printFnX both classmethods.

class ClassA(object):

    def __init__(self):
        print("Initializing A")

    # hoping that this function is called by this class's printFnX
    @classmethod
    def fnX(self, x):
        return x ** 2

    @classmethod
    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassA:",self.fnX(x))

class ClassB(ClassA):
    def __init__(self):
        print("initizlizing B")

    def fnX(self, x):
        return 2*x

    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassB:", self.fnX(x))
        ClassA.printFnX(x)


bx = ClassB()<br>
bx.printFnX(3)
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This is better than the other answer ... more elegant. Thanks. –  fodon Nov 12 '11 at 1:08
4  
This doesn't even work. Try to access an instance variable such as self.y from inside fnX. In a classmethod, the self variable no longer holds the instance; instead, it becomes the class of the caller's instance, so you've completely lost access to instance variables. This "pattern" is a disaster and something that shouldn't be used in code you care about. –  Raymond Hettinger Nov 12 '11 at 2:08
    
I agree, it just answered his original question, that is it with all the drawbacks you just described. There is no pattern here per se. –  Anand Balachandran Pillai Nov 12 '11 at 7:49

Congratulations, you've discovered the motivating use case for Python's double-underscore name mangling :-)

For the details and a worked-out example see: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html#private-variables and at http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#atom-identifiers .

Here's how to use it for your example:

# Base class definition
class ClassA(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Initializing A")

    # hoping that this function is called by this class's printFnX
    def fnX(self, x):
        return x**2
    __fnX = fnX

    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassA:",self.__fnX(x))

# Inherits from ClassA above
class ClassB(ClassA):
    def __init__(self):
        print("initizlizing B")

    def fnX(self, x):
        return 2*x

    def printFnX(self, x):
        print("ClassB:", self.fnX(x))
        ClassA.printFnX(self,x)

bx = ClassB()
bx.printFnX(3)

The use case is described as a way of implementing the Open-Closed Principle in "The Art of Subclassing" found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrboy25WKGo&noredirect=1 .

share|improve this answer
1  
Very insightful. Now I know what double-underscore naming of methods is useful for! –  Series8217 Feb 8 '12 at 22:02

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