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I have two two table joined by the following query.

SELECT     
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDCVNB, 
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAFAB, 
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAITX, dbo.ORDERLINE.DDALDT, 
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDDUVA, dbo.ORDERLINE.DDARQT, 
   dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHCANB, dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHGGNB, 
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAAGM, dbo.ORDERLINE.DDCHNB, 
   dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAAGQ
FROM         
    dbo.ORDERLINE 
LEFT OUTER JOIN
    dbo.ORDERSHIPH ON dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAFAB = dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHAFAB AND dbo.ORDERLINE.DDCVNB = dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHCVNB

The ORDERLINE table has 7 million rows and the ORDERSHP has 2 million rows.

My query result-set has 14 million rows.

How is this possible with a left outer join? Shouldn't the result set be equal to the number of rows in the ORDERLINE which is 7 million?

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Sheesh... have you ever considered using a table alias in order to avoid having to repeat that dbo.ORDERLINE. over and over and over again??? –  marc_s Oct 20 '11 at 20:47
1  
@marc_s: a completely valid question, however, those column names make me want to stab my eyes out more than the lack of table aliases. :) –  Cory Oct 20 '11 at 20:51
    
Looks like the work of a cruel DBA. –  WebWeasel Oct 20 '11 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

Your probably missing other join criteria. Without knowing all fields in your database, its going to be difficult for us to assist. Its sounds like you also need empty records from the ordership table. If not, Go with Cory's suggestion and use an inner join.

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I think an INNER or LEFT join are going to return the exact same results: there are more than one ORDERSHIPH for each ORDERLINE for the columns being JOINed. I agree though that some join criteria is probably missing. –  Cory Oct 20 '11 at 20:53

Your ON clause does not have enough join criteria and is matching 2 right rows for every left row. Essentially a cross product.

Also, you may not even want a LEFT OUTER JOIN. If you know via RI or such that there will be AT LEAST one row in the right table for every one in the left you should use an INNER JOIN.

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1  
What you need to do is ask the question in words. Do you want to know everything in the left table with the supporting information in the right if it exists? If so they LEFT OUTER JOIN is the way to go. If want to know what what is in the LEFT table where there is something in the RIGHT then INNER JOIN is what you want. –  WebWeasel Oct 20 '11 at 20:58

I found this out the hard way about outer joins:

LEFT OUTER JOIN
dbo.ORDERSHIPH ON dbo.ORDERLINE.DDAFAB = dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHAFAB AND dbo.ORDERLINE.DDCVNB = dbo.ORDERSHIPH.DHCVNB

If the ORDERSHIPH table has multiple records with the same DHAFAB and DHCVNB values (let's say two), then the select clause will return a SET of rows FOR BOTH RECORDS IN ORDERSHIPH. Which means 7 million times two. If ORDERSHIPH has lets say 3 records with those same values you'll receive 3 sets of data in return.

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