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I know there are a ton of questions regarding callbacks, scope, and closures. I apologize in advance if this is a duplicate.

I have an each loop that calls a function that performs several async actions and then issues a callback. I'm losing scope (obviously) when the callback fires. What I've done is pass the item in the loop to the function and then I return it in the callback so I have the scope I need. Is that the best way to do this? I'm not looking for something overly complicated. I just want to make sure I'm not going to run into any "gotchas".

function doSomething(varA, varB, self, callback) {
  // do a lot of ajax stuff
  callback(varA + varB, self);
}

$.each( $('.selected'), function(i, item) {
  doSomething('a', 'b', item, function(retVal, self) {
    // process retVal and self
  }
}
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you've got looks fine but for one thing: using $.each() instead of .each(). Try this:

$('.selected').each(function(i, item) {
  doSomething('a', 'b', item, function(retVal, self) {
    // process retVal and self
  }
}
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That is better syntax than what I had. –  Jay Oct 21 '11 at 14:11
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If you don't need the element reference inside doSomething, you can create a closure in this, slightly tidier way:

function doSomething(varA, varB, callback) {
  // do a lot of ajax stuff
  callback(varA + varB);
}

$.each( $('.selected'), function() {
  var self = this;
  doSomething('a', 'b', function(retVal) {
    // process retVal and self
  }
});
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I actually tried using a closure in just this way. If self was inside the loop then it lost scope. If I moved it outside the loop then the loop executed multiple times (and changed the value of self) before the callback ever occurs. The problem is the the loop keeps chugging along and the callbacks fire whenever. –  Jay Oct 21 '11 at 14:10
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The main "gotcha" people run into with ajax and loops is trying to reuse the iteration variable inside the function which executes later. For example

for (var i in col) {
  $.ajax({
    url: '...' + i + '.html',
    success: function() {
      console.log(i);  // Why is i different???
    }
  });
}

This "gotcha" occurs because there is 1 instance of i shared amongst all of the success callbacks.

In your scenario though you have one i for every "iteration" level. So this gotcha won't hit you.

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Since callback is defined within the .each() function, item still is in scope by the time you get to your callback function. So, if doSomething() never uses self, you don't need to pass it. You can just reference item:

function doSomething(varA, varB, callback) {  
  // do a lot of ajax stuff  
  callback(varA + varB);  
}  

$('.selected').each(function(i, item) {  
  doSomething('a', 'b', function(retVal) {  
    // process retVal and item
  });
});

Now, if the callback were defined outside of .each(), you'd have to do it the way you have it, passing item to doSomething():

function doSomething(varA, varB, self, callback) {  
  // do a lot of ajax stuff  
  callback(varA + varB, self);  
}  
function doSomethingCallback(retVal, self) {  
  // process retVal and item
}

$('.selected').each(function(i, item) {  
  doSomething('a', 'b', item, doSomethingCallback);
});
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This makes sense to me and this is what I believed but it didn't work this way. Both i and item are undefined when the callback is triggered. –  Jay Oct 24 '11 at 14:01
    
@Jay - In that case, something more is going on with your code. See this working demo: jsfiddle.net/gilly3/czWYK. –  gilly3 Oct 24 '11 at 16:55
    
I see that. My each block is contained in a function inside an object and the function issuing the callback is currently just a regular function. Could that be the issue? My actual code isn't going to be meaningful because of XSS and just a lot of other noise but if I can pull out of a meaningful example I will. I have it working by essentially passing state along but that seems ugly. –  Jay Oct 24 '11 at 21:01
    
@Jay - What matters is where your callback is defined in relation to the .each(). If it is defined outside of the .each(), you'll have to pass along the item as arguments as you are doing currently. But if the callback is just an anonymous function defined within the .each() that anonymous function should have access to the .each() variables. –  gilly3 Oct 24 '11 at 21:19
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