Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I did a lot of Java programming and then dropped it and did a bunch of ruby. Now I am back in Java and I am wondering whether my programming style is strange.

My code below feels very verbose to me, and the question is it reasonably idiomatic Java? Any suggestions/improvements that you would recommend?


    final static int FORCE_RIGHT = 0;
    final static int FORCE_DOWN = 1;
    final static int FORCE_LEFT = 2;
    final static int FORCE_UP = 3;
    final static int IMP_RIGHT = 4;
    final static int IMP_DOWN = 5;
    final static int IMP_LEFT = 6;
    final static int IMP_UP = 7;


    public void applyForce(int dir) {
        counter++;
        Vector2 vect = new Vector2();
        switch (dir) {
            case FORCE_RIGHT: vect = new Vector2(3.0f, 0.0f); break;
            case IMP_RIGHT: vect = new Vector2(1.0f, 0.0f); break;
            case FORCE_LEFT: vect = new Vector2(-3.0f, 0.0f); break;
            case IMP_LEFT: vect = new Vector2(-1.0f, 0.0f); break;
            case FORCE_UP: vect = new Vector2(0.0f, -3.0f); break;
            case IMP_UP: vect = new Vector2(0.0f, -1.0f); break;
            case FORCE_DOWN: vect = new Vector2(0.0f, 3.0f); break;
            case IMP_DOWN: vect = new Vector2(0.0f, 1.0f); break;
        }
        Vector2 place = body.getWorldCenter();
        if (dir == FORCE_RIGHT || dir == FORCE_LEFT || dir == FORCE_DOWN || dir == FORCE_UP) 
            { 
            body.applyForce(vect, place);
            }
        else 
            { 
            body.applyLinearImpulse(vect, place);
            }
        Log.v("CAR", "Applied force: " + dir + "("+counter+")");
    }
share|improve this question
add comment

11 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here are my improvement suggestions:

  • enums are smarter, since you can also apply behaviour, for example in your log you'd not only see a number
  • instead of the switch statement you could apply a more generic algorithm, but it's not necessarily better, since it then is more difficult to understand and change, even if it comes with less lines of code
  • no need to do new Vector2() if you call the constructor again afterwards
  • use consistent code formatting (e.g. place to put {, space charachters, ...)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, all good ideas. –  pitosalas Oct 21 '11 at 1:55
add comment

It might be a better idea to convert all your static integers to an enum.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You might consider using an enum, e.g.,

public enum Force {
    FORCE_RIGHT (3.0f, 0.0f), 
    FORCE_DOWN (1.0f, 0.0f),
    // ... 
    IMP_UP (0.0f, 1.0f);

    private int f1,f2;

    private Force(float f1, float f2) {
      this.f1 = f1;
      this.f2 = f2;
    }
    public void getF1 { return f1; }
    public void getF2 { return f2; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should make f1 and f2 final. –  Steve Kuo Oct 21 '11 at 0:57
add comment

Looks like you're stuck in pre-1.5 Java :) Read about Enum's, EnumSet and a bit about Java Practices and the answer will be obvious to you.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, that's about when I moved to Ruby :) Great feedback overall in this thread though, thanks!! –  pitosalas Oct 21 '11 at 1:48
add comment

You should read about Enums. This is clearly something that should be in an Enum class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can achieve better with enums and abstract methods (and good design, in general). It's hard to provide concrete guidance with the specifics of what you are trying to do. Here is an example of the type of code you might write:

public class Physics {
    public void apply(final Body body, final Vect place, final Direction dir) {
    float magnitude = findMagnitude();
    PhenomType phenomType = findPhenom();
    phenomType.apply(body, dir.createVect(magnitude), place);
    System.out.println("CAR Applied force: " + dir);
    }

    public enum Direction {
    UP {
        @Override
        public Vect createVect(final float magnitude) {
        return new Vect(0.0f, magnitude);
        }
    },
    DOWN {
        @Override
        public Vect createVect(final float magnitude) {
        return new Vect(0.0f, -magnitude);
        }
    },
    LEFT {
        @Override
        public Vect createVect(final float magnitude) {
        return new Vect(-magnitude, 0.0f);
        }
    },
    RIGHT {
        @Override
        public Vect createVect(final float magnitude) {
        return new Vect(magnitude, 0.0f);
        }
    };

    public abstract Vect createVect(float magnitude);
    }

    public enum PhenomType {
    FORCE {
        @Override
        public void apply(final Body body, final Vect vect, final Vect place) {
        body.applyForce(vect, place);

        }
    },
    IMPULSE {
        @Override
        public void apply(final Body body, final Vect vect, final Vect place) {
        body.applyImpulse(vect, place);
        }
    };

    public abstract void apply(Body body, Vect vect, Vect place);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
Vector2 vect = new Vector2();

could be done in a default branch of that switch statement to keep the JVM from creating an empty Vector2 when one of the other conditions would be satisfied.

share|improve this answer
add comment

One-true-brace style is easier to read (IMHO), and more common in Java:

if (dir == FORCE_RIGHT || dir == FORCE_LEFT || dir == FORCE_DOWN || dir == FORCE_UP) { body.applyForce(vect, place); }

Standard indent is 4 spaces.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Put the assignment to place before the switch, and then combine what's in the following if statement with the switch statement instead of testing it all twice.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Other than sticking to one style with your braces:

if (condition) {

vs

if (condition)
{

There isn't much you can improve on. The rest is just personal preference.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks... Some of the indenting etc was messed up by trying to get it to fit inside the ui of stack overflow. –  pitosalas Oct 21 '11 at 1:51
add comment

Suggestions that you will get here will usually be biased and will end up in endless arguments. I would just install checkstyle, PMD, findBugs etc and work on every suggestion that these tools give me

share|improve this answer
1  
I disagree. The suggested improvements are not only a matter of personal preference (like putting braces on the same or next line) but are commonly agreed best practices and lead to less buggy code. –  Jens Hoffmann Oct 20 '11 at 21:15
    
I did get lots of good suggestions. The biggest is of course using Enums which I guess I heard about but were not in Java when I last did it and so I didn't bother looking em up. –  pitosalas Oct 21 '11 at 1:51
    
@pitosalas You mean you got suggestions in this forum or by using the tools listed? –  Sap Oct 21 '11 at 14:21
    
Both really. I've installed the check style tool to see what it says; but also the glaring need to look into Enums.(There's no way to post a global comment/response to a bunch of suggestions...) –  pitosalas Oct 21 '11 at 19:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.