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Shape.h

#include"Circle.h"
#include"Square.h"
class Shape {
public:
    virtual void Draw() = 0;        
    static Shape* Create(std::string type);
};

Shape.cpp

#include "Shape.h"
Shape* Shape::Create(string type) {
    if ( type == "circle" ) return new Circle();
    if ( type == "square" ) return new Square();
    return NULL;
}

Circle.cpp

#include "Circle.h"
void Circle::Draw() {
    cout << "I am circle" << endl;
}

Circle.h

#include"Shape.h"
class Circle:public Shape {
public:
    void Draw();
    friend class Shape;
};

Square.cpp

#include "Square.h"
void Square::Draw() {
    cout << "I am Square" << endl;
}

Square.h

#include"Shape.h"
class Square:public Shape {
public:
    void Draw();
    friend class Shape;
};

It throws this error: Square.h error: expected class-name before { token [for the inheritance it does not identify Shape]

But the same code works if it is in a monolithic file(without the .cpp and .h) a single main.cpp file What is that I am missing with including header files?

Thanks in Advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to remove #include "Square.h" and #include "Circle.h" from Shape.h.

Square and Circle depend on a definition of Shape because they both inherit from Shape but Shape can - and must - be defined before Square and Circle are defined so including definitions of Circle and Square before you define Shape is incorrect.

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Thanks for the reply. I am not sure how to control the order of definition. Shape should know about Square and Circle to return the pointer in the Create function. Forward declaration is also throwing error - forward declaration of struct Circle –  phcd Oct 20 '11 at 21:38
1  
@bhadrinathpani: You can #include Circle.h and Square.h from Shape.cpp where you define Shape::Create, you just can't include them from Shape.h before you've defined class Shape. –  Charles Bailey Oct 20 '11 at 21:39
    
Is that a good practice to include files in .cpp other than the corresponding .h file(Shape.h). Is there something wrong with my design of class. –  phcd Oct 20 '11 at 21:42
    
@bhadrinathpani: You should include what you need from Shape.cpp. It's good design to only include from the .cpp if you don't need to include from the corresponding .h. –  Charles Bailey Oct 20 '11 at 21:44
    
In this case its the only option but is this(adding .h in .cpp files) what good programmers always do? I was of the opinion that good code should have its .h files(Circle.h,Square.h) in one file(Shape.h) and the includes should be order independent. Please correct me if I am wrong. –  phcd Oct 20 '11 at 21:49

You created a circular inclusion. Shape.h is including Circle.h and Square.h. Circle.h and Square.h include Shape.h. This does not make any sense.

Apparently you are also using include guards of some sort, which you are not showing to us here (if you didn't the error would be different). The include guards make sure that Shape.h is not included into itself. The result is that Square.h is included into Shape.h before the definition of Shape, which is why you get the error.

Circular inclusion is always useless. Why is

#include "Circle.h"
#include "Square.h"

present in Shape.h? What are these includes doing there? You have to make sure that you do not include Circle.h and Square.h into Shape.h.

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Thanks for the reply. Yes the guards are the usual Eclipse added stuff. On not including Circle.h and Square.h into Shape.h I get different errors: Shape.cpp: error: expected type-specifier before Circle Shape.cpp: error: cannot convert int* to Shape* in return ../Shape.cpp: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘Circle’ ../Shape.cpp: error: ‘Circle’ was not declared in this scope –  phcd Oct 20 '11 at 21:29
1  
@phcd: You might try including Circle.h and Square.h into Shape.cpp. However, a better idea would be to redesign the whole thing to make sure that Shape knows noting about Square or Circle. Your Shape::Create(string type) method should not be member of Shape. Better make it a standalone function and move it out of Shape.cpp. –  AndreyT Oct 20 '11 at 22:34

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