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Is it possible to store pointers to various heterogenous functions like:

In the header:

int  functionA (int param1);
void functionB (void);

Basically this would the part I don't know how to write:


typedef ??boost::function<void(void)>?? functionPointer;

And afterwards:

map<char*,functionPointer> _myMap;

In the .cpp

void CreateFunctionMap()
{
    _myMap["functionA"] = &functionA;
    _myMap["functionB"] = &functionB;
    ...
}

And then reuse it like:

void execute(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    if(argc>1){
        int param = atoi(argv[1]);
        int answer;
        functionPointer mfp;
        mfp = map[argv[0]];
        answer = *mfp(param);
    }
    else{
        *map[argv[0]];
    }
}

etc.

Thanks

--EDIT--

Just to give more info:

The reason for this question is that I am implementing a drop-down "quake-style" console for an already existing application. This way I can provide runtime command line user input to access various already coded functions of various types i.e.:

 /exec <functionName> <param1> <param2> ...
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How are you going to execute if the map could have a int functionA(int) and a void functionC(const std::string&)? You need some level of uniformity in the declarations to have them at all usable, so you might as well just pick a standard flexible declaration, like in @vhallac's answer. –  aschepler Oct 20 '11 at 21:38
    
In your code, what if argc>1 is true but you pass and call functionB, which accept no parameter? Maybe you should consider the Strategy Design Pattern instead, where you implement different algorithms with "functors" and you can select them at runtime, like you are doing in your function execute() –  Julien-L Oct 20 '11 at 21:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Each of your functions has a different type, so you need some kind of type erasure. You could use the most generic of them: Boost.Any. You can have a map of boost::any, but you need to know the type of the function in order to get it back and call it.

Alternatively, if you know your arguments ahead of time you can bind them with the function call and have all functions in the map be nullary functions: function< void() >. Even if you don't, you may be able to get away with it by binding the argument to references, and then at call time fill the referred variables with the appropiate arguments.

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I like the idea of the 2nd part, I'll give it a try –  Smash Oct 21 '11 at 20:43
    
ok, but then how can I be able to retrieve the type of the parameter that was bound to the function when i want to execute it, this information seems to have been lost –  Smash Oct 25 '11 at 17:42

If you want to have "pointer to something, but I'm not going to define what, and it could be a variety of things anyway" you can use void *.

But you really shouldn't.

void * is purely a pointer. In order to do anything with it, you have to cast it to a more meaningful pointer, but at that point, you've lost all type safety. What's to stop someone from using the wrong function signature? Or using a pointer to a struct?

EDIT

To give you a more useful answer, there's no need to put this all into a single map. It's ok to use multiple maps. I.e.

typedef boost::function<void(void)> voidFunctionPointer;
typedef boost::function<int(int)>   intFunctionPointer;

map<std::string, voidFunctionPointer> _myVoidMap;
map<std::string, intFunctionPointer > _myIntMap;

void CreateFunctionMap()
{
  _myVoidMap["functionA"] = &functionA;
  _myIntMap["functionB"] = &functionB;
  ...
}

void execute(int argc, char* argv[])
{

  if(argc>1){
    int param = atoi(argv[1]);
    int answer;
    // todo: check that argv[0] is actually in the map
    intFunctionPointer mfp = _myIntMap[argv[0]];
    answer = mfp(param);
  }
  else{
    // todo: check that argv[0] is actually in the map
    voidFunctionPointer mfp = _myVoidMap[argv[0]];
    mfp();
  }
}
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I believe casting function pointers to void* is non standard. –  K-ballo Oct 20 '11 at 21:31
    
boost::function is not a pointer, and does not use the dereference operator (plus, you don't dereference function pointers either). –  Cat Plus Plus Oct 20 '11 at 21:39
    
Good point with the edit. Much better than trying to cram unrelated types into a single map. –  vhallac Oct 20 '11 at 21:40
    
@CatPlusPlus, I haven't used boost::function, I was just going by the submitter's syntax. –  Tim Oct 20 '11 at 21:49
    
@ Tim, yes I thought of this, but I was wondering if there was a more general approach :) –  Smash Oct 21 '11 at 20:41

You can use

boost::variant<
    boost::function<void(void)>,
    boost::function<void(int)> >
share|improve this answer
    
ill look into this, thanks for the answer –  Smash Oct 21 '11 at 20:42

Why not just add functions of type int (*func)(int argc, char* argv[])? You could easily remove first arg from execute's params and call the relevant one.

share|improve this answer
    
because I want to access functions which are already coded (see my edit) –  Smash Oct 21 '11 at 20:40
    
@Smash You could make a new set of functions that act as a bridge between existing function and execute. Their job would be to read and parse relevant arguments, and call the other functions. This is a very C way of doing things, but it separates the concerns quite well. –  vhallac Oct 21 '11 at 20:53
    
true, but it's almost defeating the purpose, I should just do if else else else etc.. –  Smash Oct 21 '11 at 23:04

Can you not use the command pattern to encapsulate the function calls. So you can store the functions in functors and call them after wards. For functor implementation you can have a look at Modern C++ Design by Andrei Alexandrescu.

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