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I have an IAddress class with a few properties. I then have a concrete type that implements this interface. This concrete type has a couple of different constructors I could use. How can I pass parameter values to one of these constructors at run-time? I cannot use the config file as I will be reusing this concrete type multiple times and each time the parameter values will be different.

IWindsorContainer container = new WindsorContainer(new XmlInterpreter());
IAddress address = container.Resolve<IAddress>();


public interface IAddress
{
    string Address1 { get; set; }
    string Address2 { get; set; }
    string City { get; set; }
    string State { get; set; }
    string ZipCode { get; set; }
}


class TestAddress : IAddress
{

    private string _address1;
    private string _address2;
    private string _city;
    private string _countyName;
    private string _state;
    private string _zipCode;

    public string Address1
    {
        get { return _address1; }
        set { _address1 = value; }
    }

    public string Address2
    {
        get { return _address2; }
        set { _address2 = value; }
    }

    public string City
    {
        get { return _city; }
        set { _city = value; }
    }

    public string State
    {
        get { return _state; }
        set { _state = value; }
    }

    public string ZipCode
    {
        get { return _zipCode; }
        set { _zipCode = value; }
    }

    public string CountyName
    {
        get { return _countyName; }
        set { _countyName = value; }
    }


    public MelissaAddress(string address1, string address2, string city, string state, string zipcode)
    {
        Address1 = address1;
        Address2 = address2;
        City = city;
        State = state;
        ZipCode = zipcode;
    }

    public MelissaAddress(string address1, string address2, string zipcode) : this(address1, address2, null, null, zipcode)
    { }

    public MelissaAddress(string address1, string address2, string city, string state) : this(address1, address2, city, state, null)
    { }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Is this your actual code or just some sample? It looks like you're using the container as a replacement for new(). – Mauricio Scheffer Apr 24 '09 at 2:41
    
do you want to specify parameters at registration-time or resolution-time? – Mauricio Scheffer Apr 24 '09 at 2:42
    
I'd like to specify the parameters at resolution time. If I need 2 address classes each with a different address then I'd like to pass the values to each class in the constructor. – Kyle Russell Apr 24 '09 at 2:46
up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can use Resolve(object argumentsAsAnonymousType) or Resolve(IDictionary arguments). Windsor will select the best matching constructor.

For example this will select your second constructor:

container.Resolve<IAddress>(
    new {address1 = "myaddress1", address2 = "myaddress2", zipcode = "myzipcode"}
)
share|improve this answer
4  
You might also consider wrapping this invocation in a factory, or if you get addresses from elsewhere - using ISubDependencyResolver to provide them to the container, instead of passing them from the call site (if this is an option) – Krzysztof Kozmic Apr 24 '09 at 9:40
    
This helped me, thanks! – Jason More Mar 25 '10 at 19:58
    
Hmm, interesting. What if you're using the MS CommonServiceLocator rather than directly calling into Castle Windsor, though? Some sort of facility? – Neil Barnwell Apr 18 '10 at 15:57
    
Is it possible to just pass some arguments and have other arguments in the same constructor, resolved by castle windsor? – SideFX Feb 11 '11 at 20:53
    
@SideFX: no, but what you're probably asking about is done at registration time, not at resolution-time. Post a new question with all relevant details. – Mauricio Scheffer Feb 11 '11 at 21:05

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