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I have user class say, User

public class User
{
public int Id {get;set;}   
public string Name {get;set;}

}

and an interface which returns a group of users by looking at the given user's Id

public intervace IPeople
{
   IList<User> GetPeople (int id);
   string Key {get;}
}

Here are few implementations of IPeople

public class Friends : IPeople
{
   public IList<User> GetPeople (int id)
   {
      return ListOfUsersWhoAreFriends();
   }

    public string Key {get { return "Friends"; }
}


public class Fans : IPeople
{
   public IList<User> GetPeople (int id)
   {
      return ListOfFans();
   }
   public string Key {get { return "Fans"; }

}

Now in my calling method

 string key="SomeKey" ; //It could be friends or fans
 int id =1;
 IPeople[] allPeople = GetAllInstancesOf<IPeople>();

 IList<User> requiredUsers = allPeople.FirstOrDefault(m=>m.Key == key).GetPeople(id);

So to say, I create instances of all the derived classes and then check which one I need, before I call the function on it. Its working fine, but I feel, from performance point of view, its not a very good solution, as I create instance by reflection. What is the better way to achieve it. Some factory method If yes, how ??

Help will be appreciated.

Regards

Parminder

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2 Answers 2

I am guessing you are using reflection in your GetAllInstancesOf class? Not sure where you are populating your list of People from or why you need a key and an Id, but for a factory pattern in this instance, I would use the following

public IList<User> UserFactory(string kindOfPeople)
{
  switch (kindOfPeople.ToLower())
  {
    case "fans":
      return ListOfFans();
    case "friends":
      return ListOfUsersWhoAreFriends();
    default:
      return new List<User>();
  }
}

If the kinds of people (fans, friends, family etc.) is limited and doesn't change very often in your application, then I would make it an enum and pass that into the factory

public enum KindsOfPeople { Friends = 0, Fans = 1}

PS: This assumes that both Fans and Friends derive from the User class. This wasn't shown in your code. A nice way of using the factory pattern is if all the possible classes that are returned from the factory inherit from a common base class.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Chaitanya, but I dont like Ifs, switch and enums in here. think what if I want to create new Type of people, will need to change the code again. –  Parminder Oct 21 '11 at 1:03
1  
@Parminder What do you think is happening inside your Autofac answer? All kinds of Ifs and Switches and HashTables, etc. You are just removed from it. –  LarsTech Oct 21 '11 at 1:22
1  
With your Autofac answer, you still have to change the code when you have to create a new type anyway. If you want to avoid that, you should register the classes using a configuration file. Not sure about Autofac but some of the other DI (Dependency Injection) containers like Spring.Net will allow you to do it both in code and configuration. –  Chaitanya Oct 21 '11 at 1:58
    
@LarsTech thanks for the feedback. I can understand what you are saying. But at least I configure things using some config file at later stage. Also if I end up doing same thing what Autofac is doing, its better use it, rather than reinventing it. –  Parminder Oct 21 '11 at 2:55

I feel, I found a better solution. Here it goes.

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IPeople
{
    IList<User> GetPeople(int id);

}


public class Friends : IPeople
{
    public IList<User> GetPeople(int id)
    {
        return new List<User>();
    }



    public class Fans : IPeople
    {
        public IList<User> GetPeople(int id)
        {
            return new List<User>();
        }
    }


    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
            builder.RegisterType<Friends>().Named<IPeople>("Friends");
            builder.RegisterType<Fans>().Named<IPeople>("Fans");

            IContainer c = builder.Build();

            var x = c.ResolveNamed<IPeople>("Friends");

        }
    }
}

As I am using Autofac, I looks after the register with named keys.

Thanks

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2  
I don't know autofac so can't say what it's doing, but it's very possible that it will still use reflection to create a new instance of a given implementation of IPeople every time you call ResolveNamed. So if you're worried about performance you've just hidden the problem. Before you actually make any performance-related changes you should measure to see if it really matters. Instantiating an object does not cost much (especially if does no work in the constructor). –  marcind Oct 21 '11 at 2:00
    
@marcind thanks, I know its hidden, but I feel at this stage I can rely on it, Will see if I can do it better at some other stage. –  Parminder Oct 21 '11 at 2:57

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