Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code when run obviously prints out "B1/A2/B2". Now, is it possible for it to print "A1/A2/B2" instead (i.e. A#method2() should invoke method1() on A, not on B)?

Note: I have no such need to get pass polymorphism, this question is out of curiosity only.

class A {
    public void method1() {
        System.out.println("A1");
    }

    public void method2() {
        method1();
        System.out.println("A2");
    }
}

class B extends A {
    @Override public void method2() {
        super.method2();
        System.out.println("B2");

    }

    @Override public void method1() {
        System.out.println("B1");
    }
}

public class Tmp {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        B b = new B();
        b.method2();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
If you make method1() final in class A, it will be called, but it will not be available to be overridden in a descendant class. –  DwB Sep 22 '11 at 19:27
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do it. Define A in package a:

package a;
public class A {
    void method1() {
        System.out.println("A1");
    }
    public void method2() {
        method1();
        System.out.println("A2");
    }
}

Define B in package b:

package b;
import a.A;
public class B extends A {
    @Override public void method2() {
        super.method2();
        System.out.println("B2");
    }
    void method1() {
        System.out.println("B1");
    }
}

Put your test in package a and run it. The result is A1/A2/B2. Of course this is unhealthy: note the necessary omission of @Override on method1 - if you put it back in, you will get a compiler error:

method does not override or implement a method from a supertype
share|improve this answer
    
this is wrong. to my understanding of java once you can no longer access overriddem methods once you instantiate a subclass. –  Andreas Petersson Apr 24 '09 at 6:40
    
Andreas - your understanding is wrong. Package protection kicks in here and messes things up, compile and run to see for yourself. Here are couple of links that explain similar behavior: gbracha.blogspot.com/2009/03/… dow.ngra.de/2009/02/16/the-ultimate-java-puzzler –  Yardena Apr 25 '09 at 17:30
add comment

I don't believe so; not if you're overriding method1() in a subclass. If you really required that behavior, you'd have to declare A.method1() as final, and you couldn't define it in B.

It doesn't make sense to me to do this - you should reconsider your design if you think you need to!

share|improve this answer
    
Possible, valid use case: the toString() method is implemented in class Foo and you're implementing some thread-safety stuff and want to print to log file the identifier of the object, returned by Object.toString() method - yet you can't do it. –  Piotr Suszyński Mar 4 '13 at 16:22
add comment

You could also make the A.method1 private. Then, even if you have B.method1, A.method1 will be called instead. But I'm not sure about that, you should check

share|improve this answer
add comment

To do this, you'd have to method method1 non-virtual. To do that, you make it final:

  public final void method1() {....

Or you make it private; in Java pivate methods are always non-virtual:

   private void method1() {....

(Note that in C++, private methods may be virtual or non-virtual; among other things that makes implementing the Template Method Pattern cleaner in C++.)

Here's what's happening: when a non-static method is called through an object reference (which is the only way to call a non-static object method in Java), the method called depends on the actual type of the object referred-to (pointed-to), not the type of the reference.

Within an object method, calls to other methods (or members) of that object are implicitly prefixed with "this.". So your call to method1 in method2 is really:

public void method2() {
    this.method1();
    System.out.println("A2");
}

And this is an object reference. In method2, which is in class A, the reference is of type A, as if this had been declared:

A this;

But that reference points to an object of type B; it can do that because B is derived from, inherits, subclasses, is-a, A.

As I mentioned above, "when a non-static method is called through an object reference the method called depends on the actual type of the object referred-to, not the type of the reference." When you instantiated an object of type B, and called method2(), the this you passed in (this is really a hidden parameter of any non-static function) is a this that points to a B object. When B.method2() called super(), that same this was passed to A.method2().

And so when A.method2() called method1(), what really happened is we called this.method1() with that same this, which refers to a B, the B you instantied in main() and called method2() on.

Since method1() is virtual, and since we are calling method1() on a reference to an object of type B, the compiler makes sure that B's re-definition of method1() is the one called.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Using standard "natural" and well accepted Java mechanisms you cannot. Java is designed so that all methods are dynamically dispatched unless final or static (or called to super), and in your case. Since the method is overridden in B, none of these is an option. There is no mechanism to "disable" dynamic dispatching in specific cases but the good news is that there is rarely a need to.

You could overcome some of these limitations with reflection, but that's like unwrapping a precious gift with sledgehammer.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. As to the "reflection" part - I tried but it didn't work (stackoverflow.com/questions/784542/…) –  Buu Nguyen Apr 24 '09 at 14:45
    
reflection is not going to help, but reducing visibility of method1 can, as I showed below. –  Yardena Apr 25 '09 at 17:44
    
That's a good point. I treat reflection as an important mechanism that can be abused. I think if one was really inclined there might be a way to do this but I'm not sure, so I agree with Yardena. –  Uri Apr 25 '09 at 23:34
add comment

Even I WAS looking for this solution. It seems its not possible. Changing the base class is not an option. i.e. assuming that base class is already written and you are deriving a class from it, there's nothing you can do in the derived class so that the base class calls its own methods and not overridden methods. if you are making an object of the derived class, base class will call overridden methods of derived class instead of calling its own methods. that's OOPS....

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.