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Basically, I have many companies that can have many offices, how do I get my query to show this, I have: The problem (or so it seems to me is), I am retrieving a company 3 times (example below), when I should only recieve one company and many offices, is my query just plain wrong?

//companies = _repo.All<Companies>();
//mainoffice = _repo.All<Office>();

        var dto = companies
           .Join(mainoffice, x => x._ID, y => y.CompanyID, (x, y) => new
            {
                mycompany = x,
                myoffice = y,
            })
            .Select(x => new
                {
                    ID = x.mycompany._ID,
                    Offices = x.myoffice
                }); 

enter image description here

However if I do a group join, I get what I want but I am getting back companies that dont have offices...

  var dto = companies
           .GroupJoin(mainoffice, x => x._ID, y => y.CompanyID, (x, y) => new
            {
                mycompany = x,
                myoffice = y,
            })
            .Select(x => new
                {
                    ID = x.mycompany._ID,
                    Offices = x.myoffice
                }); 

Update: 1 more nested result set...

        var areascovered = repo.All<OfficePostCode>();

        var filter = repo.All<PostCodeDistrict>()
            .Where(x => x.Region.StartsWith(postcode))
            .Join(areascovered, x => x.PostCodeID, y => y.PostCodeID, (x, y) =>
                 new
                 {
                     Postcode = x.PostCode,
                     Region = x.Region,
                     OfficeID = y.OfficeID
                 });

        var mainoffice = repo.All<Office>();

        var dto = companies
            .Select(company => new
            {
                ID = company._ID,
                Offices = mainoffice.Select(office => new
                {
                    CompanyID = office.CompanyID,
                    Name = office.Name,
                    Tel = office.Tel,
                    RegionsCovered = filter.Where(f => f.OfficeID == office.OfficeID)
                })
                .Where(y => y.CompanyID == company._ID)// && y.RegionsCovered.Any())
            })
            .Where(pair => pair.Offices.Any());
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't need a join, you just need a nested select. Try something like this instead:

from company in companies
select new
{
   ID = company._ID,
   Offices = mainoffice.Where(office => office.CompanyID == company._ID)
}

If you don't want entries with companies without offices then try this one:

from company in companies
let offices = mainoffice.Where(office => office.CompanyID == company._ID)
where offices.Any()
select new
{
   ID = company._ID,
   Offices = offices
}

Explicit lambda version (dot notation):

First one:

companies.Select(company => new
{
    ID = company._ID,
    Offices = mainoffice.Where(office => office.CompanyID == company._ID)
});

Companies without offices, removed:

companies.Select(company => new
{
    ID = company._ID,
    Offices = mainoffice.Where(office => office.CompanyID == company._ID)
})
.Where(pair => pair.Offices.Any());
share|improve this answer
    
@lasseepeholt - is there a lamdba version of this? –  Haroon Oct 21 '11 at 8:24
    
@Haroon Yeah, sure. 2 sec. –  Lasse Espeholt Oct 21 '11 at 8:31
    
@Haroon There you go :) I haven't tested it but I think it will do. –  Lasse Espeholt Oct 21 '11 at 8:35
    
In fact both of them are lambda, first one is query syntax and second one is dot notation. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 21 '11 at 8:37
    
@SaeedAmiri Yeah, but I guess everyone knows what Haroon means. But the name is changed :) –  Lasse Espeholt Oct 21 '11 at 8:39

It's not necessary to join company with office, in such a join you see each company as the number of office it has, I think you can try bellow:

companies.SelectMany(x=>x.Offices).Select(x=>new {ID = x.CompanyID, Office = x})

Or

offices.GroupBy(x=>x.CompanyID).Select( x=>new {ID = Key, Offices = x});

I'd assumed you have company ID in each office.

if you also want to have full company you cxan do

var officeGroups = 
    offices.GroupBy(x=>x.CompanyID).Select( x=>new {ID = Key, Offices = x});

var result = from c in companies
               join o in officeGroups on c.ID equals o.ID
               select new {Company = c, Offices = o.Offices};
share|improve this answer
    
in your first example, what is Offices, do you mean mainoffice? Also, using your example will cause me to lose the reference to companies –  Haroon Oct 21 '11 at 8:16
    
@Haroon I think you have a table for your office, am I right? offices refers to this table. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 21 '11 at 8:18
    
In fact, both examples cause me to lose reference to the companies, I need companies as it contains other information I need to project out to the UI –  Haroon Oct 21 '11 at 8:18
    
I think my second example is better for you. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 21 '11 at 8:19
    
@Haroon in your sample you project on your company ID, do you want to have a companies compeletly? –  Saeed Amiri Oct 21 '11 at 8:21

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