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Clojure question

I have written the following function in clojure: In the first loop it iterates a list of maps and creates a map. Then the second loop iterates a list, matches data from the map previously created and a vector and returns a new map. However, different runs with the same data produce diffenet results. See below.

(defn resolve-case-per-period
  "Constructs a map by matching data existing in input parameter vectors"
  [dd case-details periods]
  (let [cases ((fn [in] 
                 (loop [case-details in, result-map {}] 
                   (if (= (count case-details) 0) 
                     result-map 
                     (recur (rest case-details) 
                            (assoc result-map
                              (:priority (first case-details)) 
                              (:caseid (first case-details)))))))
               case-details)
         periods periods]
    (info "Mapping cases to periods step 1 completed " cases)
    (loop [periods periods, result-map {}]
      (if (= (count periods) 0)
        result-map
        (recur (rest periods) 
               (conj result-map
                     { (str (:period (first periods)))
                       (get cases (:priority (first periods)))}))))))

The returned output is of a map like the following:

{31-10-10 20 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 10 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 21 10020101030122036M, 30-10-10 21 10020101030200157M, 31-10-10 00 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 11 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 22 10020101031112152M, 30-10-10 22 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 01 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 12 10020101030122036M, 30-10-10 23 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 02 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 13 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 03 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 14 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 04 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 15 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 05 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 16 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 06 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 17 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 07 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 18 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 08 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 19 10020101030122036M, 31-10-10 09 10020101030122036M}

Executing the function with the same parameters sometimes yields

{31-10-10 20 nil, 31-10-10 10 nil, 31-10-10 21 nil, 30-10-10 21 nil, 31-10-10 00 nil, 31-10-10 11 nil, 31-10-10 22 nil, 30-10-10 22 nil, 31-10-10 01 nil, 31-10-10 12 nil, 30-10-10 23 nil, 31-10-10 02 nil, 31-10-10 13 nil, 31-10-10 03 nil, 31-10-10 14 nil, 31-10-10 04 nil, 31-10-10 15 nil, 31-10-10 05 nil, 31-10-10 16 nil, 31-10-10 06 nil, 31-10-10 17 nil, 31-10-10 07 nil, 31-10-10 18 nil, 31-10-10 08 nil, 31-10-10 19 nil, 31-10-10 09 nil}
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3  
Don't be discuraged if you are getting some tough love in the answers, Clojure is different from more procedural languages, so it can be harder to get going. But there are good reasons for the differences and I am sure you will see the benefits if you stick with it a little bit. –  Paul Oct 21 '11 at 9:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Everything in this function is deterministic and pure (except the info calls, which shouldn't matter), so it should return the same thing every time. You don't provide any sample inputs, so I can't disprove this assumption.

The code is hard to read, and with no context I don't really understand what you're doing. But I went through your code in several refactoring passes to try to make it clearer what's going on. Hopefully this will help someone else who is reading, or even make it clearer to you where your problem is.

First

Remove all the crazy formatting and pointless variable-copying, and use seq instead of testing count=0

(defn resolve-case-per-period
  "Constructs a map by matching data existing in input parameter vectors"
  [dd case-details periods]
  (let [cases (loop [case-details case-details, result-map {}] 
                (if (seq case-details)
                  (recur (rest case-details)
                         (assoc result-map 
                           (:priority (first case-details))
                           (:caseid (first case-details)))) 
                  result-map))]
    (info "Mapping cases to periods step 1 completed " cases)
    (loop [periods periods, result-map {}]
      (if (seq periods)
        (recur (rest periods) 
               (assoc result-map
                 (str (:period (first periods)))
                 (get cases (:priority (first periods)))))
        (do (info "Mapping cases to periods step 2 completed " result-map)
            result-map)))))

Second

Destructuring and if-let instead of primitive keyword lookups, ifs, and seqs:

(defn resolve-case-per-period
  "Constructs a map by matching data existing in input parameter vectors"
  [dd case-details periods]
  (let [cases (loop [case-details case-details, result-map {}] 
                (if-let [[{:keys [priority case-id]} & more] (seq case-details)]
                  (recur more
                         (assoc result-map priority caseid)) 
                  result-map))]
    (info "Mapping cases to periods step 1 completed " cases)
    (loop [periods periods, result-map {}]
      (if-let [[{:keys [period priority]} & more] (seq periods)]
        (recur more
               (assoc result-map
                 (str period)
                 (get cases priority)))
        (do (info "Mapping cases to periods step 2 completed " result-map)
            result-map)))))

Third

At this point it's finally clear that we're just iterating over a sequence and building up a result value as we go, so we can drop all the first/rest nonsense and just use reduce to traverse the sequence for us:

(defn resolve-case-per-period
  "Constructs a map by matching data existing in input parameter vectors"
  [dd case-details periods]
  (let [cases (reduce (fn [result-map {:keys [priority case-id]}]
                        (assoc result-map priority caseid))
                      {}, case-details)]
    (info "Mapping cases to periods step 1 completed " cases)
    (reduce (fn [result-map {:keys [period priority]}]
              (assoc result-map
                (str period)
                (get cases priority)))
            {}, periods)))
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1  
I really like the way you show how you pass over the code several times, making improvements each time. Thanks for taking the time. May I suggest removing dd from the argument list of the original function. AFAICS it is not used anywhere. –  Paul Oct 21 '11 at 9:14
    
Thank you for your thorough answer. –  kostas Oct 21 '11 at 9:45
    
Thank you for your thorough answer. The first data structure, case-details is a list that contains map data structures as the following {:caseid 10020101029093512M, :exectime 29-oct-2010 09:35:17, :priority 30856568000M, :studymodeid 11M}. The second parameter, periods is another list that contains instances as the following {:period 29-10-10 21, :priority 30851039000M}. What i am trying to do is build a map with keys :period, extracted from the second list and values :caseid extracted from the first list. –  kostas Oct 21 '11 at 9:55
    
I still have the same problem. –  kostas Oct 21 '11 at 11:19
    
Two consecutive runs produce the following:lein run 20-10-2010 1021 141954 619 INFO quartzTest.dao [main] Retrieving case list 4 cases for that day 1021 141954 729 INFO quartzTest.dao [main] Retrieving periods and corresponding up-to-date execution times: 25 1021 141954 812 INFO quartzTest.utils [main] Done resolving case per period {20-10-10 20 nil, ....} and lein run 21-10-2010 1021 142111 154 INFO quartzTest.dao [main] Retrieving case list 4 cases for that day 1021 142111 317 INFO quartzTest.utils [main] Done resolving case per period {21-10-10 10 10020101020111632M ...} –  kostas Oct 21 '11 at 11:22

It will be difficult to answer your question if we don't know what your data (function input) looks like, but a few points:

  1. dd is never used in your function, so you can get rid of that.
  2. It is idiomatic in Clojure to have fairly short functions, so I would suggest factoring the part that you do in let out into another function. That will also make testing and experimentation at the repl easier.
  3. Remapping periods to periods in the let has no effect, so get rid of that.
  4. You shadow a lot of locals (case-details in the let and periods in the loop) , this can be confusing and I would advise against it.
  5. The keys in your resulting map are strings, I presume of the form "31-10-10 20". This is easier to discern with the quotes.

I honestly don't see how this Clojure function could be responsible for giving you different outputs, are you absolutely sure that the input is identical? As an observation in the first case you get BigDecimals for the values, so my guess is that in the second case something that couldn't handle BigDecimals was in contact with the data. But I don't see how this could have happend in the function you provide.

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