Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In some domain object's method , they didn't use the attribute directly, but use the get method . Why ? One example as follows:

private List<String> errorCodeList = new ArrayList<String>();  

/** 
 * Add all errors to the error list.
 */
public void addAllErrors(Collection<String> theErrorStrings) {
    if (errorCodeList == null) {
        errorCodeList = new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    for (String aString: theErrorStrings) {
        getErrorCodeList().add(aString);
    }
}


/**
 * @return the errorCodes
 */
public List<String> getErrorCodeList() {
    return errorCodeList;
}
/**
 * Set the error strings.
  */
public void setErrorCodeList(List<String> allErrors) {
    this.errorCodeList = allErrors;
}
share|improve this question
    
One advantage that you can see from your code is that you can return a List<String> instead of an ArrayList<String> –  Blem Oct 21 '11 at 8:49
    
This might simply be the result of a refactoring in Eclipse when introducing the getter and setter. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 21 '11 at 9:48

6 Answers 6

It's a matter of encapsulation. By providing access to instance variables only via getters and setters you hide the internal representation. Thus you are able to change the implementation afterwards without modifying the interface. You might decide that it would be more convenient to use a HashMap to store the error codes (for whatever reason) and once you changed that, all code accessing the field would break. If you provided getter and setter however, you are able to keep them as they are in spite of your changed internal representation.

In addition to it is easier to ensure that invariants are kept in place, which you were unable to do if everybody could access the fields.

share|improve this answer
    
seconded. as long as you fulfil the interface (even inside the class), the internal representation doesn't change, and you're supporting good coding practice (from whoever reads the code) –  darkphoenix Oct 21 '11 at 8:55
2  
The question was regarding the use of a field within the same class it and the getter are defined. –  John B Oct 21 '11 at 8:55
    
Which my answer addresses as well. By using only getters and setters to access a field (no matter of from within the class or by external access) you have the chance to enforce your invariants. If you use the field directly, every single access to the field in all of your code requires you to think about upholding all restrictions. –  Till Helge Oct 21 '11 at 8:58

I'm personally not a fan of accessing fields within the same class via their getter methods: Encapsulation is not being broken by avoiding calling the getter because you're writing code within the same class definition. Also, using getters makes the code look more cluttered and doesn't provide effective syntax highlighting.

There are obviously exceptions where you have to access the field through a getter:

  • When it's lazily created.
  • When the getter calculates a value on the fly.
share|improve this answer

I think the sample code is not the best way to do it: the variable is being accessed directly and through the getter in the same method - this mixing is kind of confusing.
It would be clearer if the lazy creation of the list was done in the getter and a reason to use the getter. Example:

public void addAllErrors(Collection<String> theErrorStrings) {
    for (String aString: theErrorStrings) {
        getErrorCodeList().add(aString);
    }
}

public List<String> getErrorCodeList() {
    // TODO synchronization?
    if (errorCodeList == null) {
        errorCodeList = new ArrayList<String>();
    }

    return errorCodeList;
}
share|improve this answer

That is encapsulation:

Encapsulation can be described as a protective barrier that prevents the code and data being randomly accessed by other code defined outside the class. Access to the data and code is tightly controlled by an interface.

More information available here.

share|improve this answer
1  
The question was regarding access from within the class in which the field / getter are defined. –  John B Oct 21 '11 at 8:49

It can be considered good practice to use a getter within a call is the getter exists. This is because if the implementation behind the getter were to change the rest of the code in the class that uses the getter would not need to change.

It also can ease static code analysis since all access to the field (either from within the class or without) are done via a single method.

There of course is the trade off of the extra method call (unless the compiler is smart enough to do the conversion).

That said, I agree with Adamski, I am not a fan of this either.

share|improve this answer

Encapsulation won't be broken by directly accessing data members, but what about, after a couple of month, a data member change semantics and you've got to search in one hundred derived classes where that field was accessed directly just to be sure that nothing breaks up ? If access is solely done via getter, it's a lot easier to track where each field is accessed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.