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I have the following problem. I want to make a diet plan using php & mysql. I have the following:

  • Bread: 1g of Protein, 2g of carbohydrate, 4g of fat
  • Sugar: 3g of Protein, 6g of carbohydrate, 1g of fat
  • Coffee: 8g of Protein, 2g of carbohydrate, 2g of fat
  • Meat: 7g of Protein, 0g of carbohydrate, 12g of fat
  • Milk: 16g of Protein, 12g of carbohydrate, 2g of fat

Having the above, I want to find the best combination of those above to match the following total:

GOAL: 160g Protein -- 41g of carbohydrate -- 120g of fat.

and show the result like: 5 pieces of Meat, 3 pieces of Milk, etc.

I don't have a problem with php & mysql. I try to find the logic behind this problem.

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3 Answers 3

Not trivial. Get a book or a good web page about Dynamic Programming, specifically Knapsack problem.

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Here's a brute-force solution that should work. This is a SQL script (written in SQL Server, should work in MySql, but may require minor changes) that will iterate through all possible combinations of items before finding the optimal solution.

-- Limits by protein/carb/fat
DECLARE @protein_limit INT
SET @protein_limit = 160

DECLARE @carb_limit INT
SET @carb_limit = 90

DECLARE @fat_limit INT
SET @fat_limit = 120



-- Table holding valid items
DECLARE @items TABLE
(
    id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    name VARCHAR(50),
    protein INT,
    carb INT,
    fat INT
)

INSERT INTO @items
      SELECT 'Bread', 1, 2, 4
UNION SELECT 'Sugar', 3, 6, 1
UNION SELECT 'Coffee', 8, 2, 2
UNION SELECT 'Meat', 7, 0, 12
UNION SELECT 'Milk', 16, 12, 2


DECLARE @item_count INT
SELECT @item_count = COUNT(*)
FROM @items


-- From: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9507635/pivot-integer-bitwise-values-in-sql/9509598#9509598
DECLARE @bits TABLE
(
    number INT,
    [bit] INT,
    value INT
)


; with AllTheNumbers as (
    select cast (POWER(2, @item_count) as int) - 1 Number
    union all
    select Number - 1
    from AllTheNumbers
    where Number > 0
),
Bits as (
    select @item_count - 1 Bit
    union all
    select  Bit - 1
    from Bits
    where Bit > 0
)
INSERT INTO @bits (number, [bit], value)
select *, case when (Number & cast (POWER(2, Bit) as int)) != 0 then 1 else 0 end
from AllTheNumbers cross join Bits
order by Number, [Bit] desc


-- Table to hold trials - brute force!
DECLARE @trials TABLE
(
    trial_id INT,
    item_id INT,
    item_quantity INT
)


DECLARE @trial_max INT
SET @trial_max = (@protein_limit + @carb_limit + @fat_limit) * (POWER(2, @item_count))

DECLARE @trial_id INT
SET @trial_id = 1

DECLARE @base_quantity INT

WHILE @trial_id <= @trial_max
BEGIN

    SET @base_quantity = FLOOR((@trial_id / POWER(2, @item_count)))

    INSERT INTO @trials (trial_id, item_id, item_quantity)
    SELECT @trial_id + 1 + b.number
        , id
        , @base_quantity + b.value
    FROM @items a
    JOIN @bits b
        ON a.id = b.[bit] + 1



    --UPDATE @trials
    --SET item_quantity = @base_quantity + (@trial_id % item_id)
    --WHERE trial_id = @trial_id

    SET @trial_id = @trial_id + POWER(2, @item_count)

END


-- Get results of each trial
SELECT *
FROM @trials a
JOIN @items b
    ON a.item_id = b.id
ORDER BY a.trial_id

-- Use the trial_id field to reference the results of the previous select
SELECT *
FROM
(
    SELECT trial_id
        , SUM(protein * item_quantity) AS protein_total
        , SUM(carb * item_quantity) AS carb_total
        , SUM(fat * item_quantity) AS fat_total
    FROM @trials a
    JOIN @items b
        ON a.item_id = b.id
    GROUP BY trial_id
) a
WHERE protein_total <= @protein_limit
    AND carb_total <= @carb_limit
    AND fat_total <= @fat_limit
ORDER BY ((@protein_limit - protein_total) + (@carb_limit - carb_total) - (@fat_limit - fat_total)) ASC


-- This last query gets the best fit
SELECT c.name
    , b.item_quantity
FROM
(
    SELECT *
        , ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY ((@protein_limit - protein_total) + (@carb_limit - carb_total) - (@fat_limit - fat_total)) ASC) AS rn
    FROM
    (
        SELECT trial_id
            , SUM(protein * item_quantity) AS protein_total
            , SUM(carb * item_quantity) AS carb_total
            , SUM(fat * item_quantity) AS fat_total
        FROM @trials a
        JOIN @items b
            ON a.item_id = b.id
        GROUP BY trial_id
    ) a
    WHERE protein_total <= @protein_limit
        AND carb_total <= @carb_limit
        AND fat_total <= @fat_limit
) a
JOIN @trials b
    ON a.trial_id = b.trial_id
JOIN @items c
    ON b.item_id = c.id
WHERE a.rn = 1

This will return three results, each a different way of viewing the data.

Let me know if it works!

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The problem itself is a bit flawed. Are you trying to get as close as you can to those targets without going over? Are you merely looking for 'some solution' that's close to those numbers? Depending on how you define what qualifies as an acceptable answer, this can be a very easy or very very very hard problem to solve just off the cuff.

For example, add a new ingredient that has 1g of each protein, carb, and fat. Also add 3 more ingredients, each that has 1g of a unique nutrient--one is 1g protein, 0 carb/fat, one is 1g carb 0g protein/fat, etc. Here you have at least two, if not many, solutions that would both match the target exactly.

Let's continue on and also assume the protein food is gross to you so you'd rather have a lot more of the 1g/1g/1g nutrient instead. How do we weigh solutions if we can't quite hit the target but don't have you drink 15 glasses of milk and nothing else.

The knapsack problem is a great start but there's a million different ways you can branch this problem off into and if you're going to try and code a solution I recommend trying to solve for something specific and then trying to expand that as you understand what's going on under the hood.

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