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currently I'm creating proxy classes from interfaces with spring 3 xml config like this:

<bean id="abstractDaoTarget" class="mypackage.GenericDaoImpl" abstract="true" />

<bean id="abstractDao" class="org.springframework.aop.framework.ProxyFactoryBean" abstract="true" />

<bean id="personDao" parent="abstractDao">
    <property name="proxyInterfaces">
        <value>mypackage.CustomerDao</value>
    </property>
    <property name="target">
        <bean parent="abstractDaoTarget">
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>

Note that I have only one interface named PersonDao and NO implementation of this interface. The above xml snippet works fine, I can create an 'instance' of the interface.

My Question is how can I achieve this with pure Spring 3 annotations without the above xml snippet? Is it possible without xml?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you looking for an way to generate Beans with an factory completely written in Java without xml? - Then use @Configuration to annotate the class and @Bean to annotate the method that creates the bean. 3.11.1 Basic concepts: @Configuration and @Bean

If this is not what you mean, then have a look at the code of Hades. This is a project that do the same think like (I guess) you. Creating DAOs from Interfaces.

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Hades is the root of what is now Spring Data JPA –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 21 '11 at 12:24
    
Sean Patrick Floyd is correct, so if you want to use it, than use Spring Data JPA instread of hades. But if you only want to see who they did it, then go with Hades, because I guess Spring Data JPA is much more code than Hades, so you will find the pice of code you need faster when you look at hades (and I know the code is readable). –  Ralph Oct 21 '11 at 12:57
    
Hades was a pretty nice tip. I actually wanted to know how it works under the hood. Hades helped me pretty much with it. –  flash Oct 21 '11 at 13:27

Have a look at Spring Data JPA. Here's an introductory tutorial. They are doing pretty much exactly what you are.

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Thanks for the link to Spring Data JPA. I didn't know they building some generic DAO api. I think I will give it a try in my next project. –  flash Oct 21 '11 at 13:30

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