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If I want to write a query with a simple join, I can do this:

select * from customer c
join order o
on c.customerid = o.customerid
where c.customerid = 100

and it all works fine. In this query, is there a reason why I have to specify a table alias - ie. c.customerid? Why can't I just write this:

select * from customer c
join order o
on c.customerid = o.customerid
where customerid = 100

I get the error Ambiguous column name 'customerid'. In this case, where there's only one column in the WHERE clause and it's the column on which I'm JOINing, is this actually "ambiguous"? Or is it just to comply with the ansi-standard (I'm guessing here - I don't know if it does comply) and to encourage good coding conventions?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For your specific example I can't think of any circumstances in which it would make a difference. However for an INNER JOIN on a string column it could do as below.

DECLARE @customer TABLE
(customerid CHAR(3) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS)

INSERT INTO @customer VALUES('FOO');

DECLARE @order TABLE
(customerid CHAR(3) COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS)

INSERT INTO @order VALUES('FOO');


SELECT * 
FROM @customer c
JOIN @order o
ON c.customerid = o.customerid COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS
WHERE c.customerid = 'Foo' /*Returns 1 row*/

SELECT * 
FROM @customer c
JOIN @order o
ON c.customerid = o.customerid COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS
WHERE o.customerid = 'Foo' /*Returns 0 rows*/
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Nice, that's an even better example than what I had in mind. –  Lukas Eder Oct 21 '11 at 11:46
    
@Martin Smith - thanks for a) answering the question and b) providing an interesting example –  Paul Spangle Oct 21 '11 at 13:19

Omitting the table alias really does make for an ambiguous column reference. Just make your join a left join, and you'll immediately see why:

select * from customer c
left join order o
on c.customerid = o.customerid
where customerid = 100 -- here, the semantics are quite different

Another reason: One column could be of type INTEGER, the other of type SMALLINT. Which one to use for the filter? (This might have implications on the execution plan). An even better example is given by Martin Smith

So in general, you wouldn't gain much by making SQL more "forgiving", while at the same time introducing new sources of error. What you could do with some databases (not SQL Server), however is this:

select * from customer c
join order o
using (customerid)
where customerid = 100

Or this (if customerid is the only common column name)

select * from customer c
natural join order o
where customerid = 100
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+1 SQL Server doesn't support using or natural join though and I'm not sure how the datatype affects things? The INNER JOIN would only return values that fit in the range of smallint anyway. –  Martin Smith Oct 21 '11 at 11:14
    
@MartinSmith: You're right, thanks. The datatype would probably affect the execution plan. –  Lukas Eder Oct 21 '11 at 11:18

You are getting the error because the customerid column exists in both the order and customer tables and SQL doesn't know which column the condition should be applied to.

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After JOINing two tables, the resulting table contains 2 columns having the same name of customerid. So you need to tell the WHERE clause which column to use by adding the table name as prefix.

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Well...you know that the result set will only contain entries with exactly the same customerid, the database server however does not, because he doesn't "understand" what you are specifying. And if you had a join that does not have both customerids exactly the same in the result set, you will be happy, that the server distinguishes them. ;)

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Ambiguous column error only come when we need to do some operation on a field which has in more then one table so in this case SQL can not recognize that from which table filed it need to operate.

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