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This is simple function

function check_nickname($item)
{
    if (preg_match('/^[a-z\d_]{1,15}$/', $item)) {
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
}

It returns only true or false.

But If it is false I want it to return False + some text in a string or something.

if(check_nickname($item))

will get true/false. but if it is false then how can I echo some text string ?

share|improve this question
    
Return a string that's empty "if true"? –  DevSolar Oct 21 '11 at 12:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To do that you need to send a variable to the function that can be modified within the function. You do that with references. Example explains it better than words;

function check_nickname($item, &$sometext)
{
    if (preg_match('/^[a-z\d_]{1,15}$/', $item)) {
    return true;
  } else {
    $some_text = 'enter your message here';
    return false;
  }
}

if(!check_nickname($item, $txt))
{
   echo $txt; // echoes "enter your message here";
}
share|improve this answer

You have several options.

1. Pass argument by reference

You can change your method signature to pass-in a string reference, eg:

function check_nickname($item, &$output)

and in the function body you set the output to what you want, e.g.: $output = "some text";

2. Return array

Alternatively, you can also return an array (or an object) instead of just a boolean:

return array(true, "some text");

3. Encapsulate functionality in a class

Yet another option would be to encapsulate this functionality in a class. This means more code to write initially, but makes the consuming code more readable.

class NickNameChecker {
    private $nick;
    private $reason;

    public function __construct($nickname) {
        $this->nick = $nickname;
    }
    public function check() {
        if (preg_match('/^[a-z\d_]{1,15}$/', $this->nick)) {
            return true;
        }
        $this->reason = "some text";
        return false;
    }
    public function getReason() {
        return $this->reason;
    }
}

// usage:
$checker = new NickNameChecker("brian griffin");
if (!$checker->check()) {
    echo $checker->getReason();
}
share|improve this answer

A clean way might be to use the Exception mechanism. When it is false you throw an exception with the message you want.

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Exception mechanism is used for situations when regular execution of a particular function would not be a good idea. This is not the case, OP just wants to add some more information to return data. –  naivists Oct 21 '11 at 13:16

I'd make it just

if (!check_nickname($item)) $message = "Martian names not accepted!";
share|improve this answer
return array(false, "some other string");

then myFunction()[0] for false and myFunction()[1] for "some other string".

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