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I have a Makefile with the following:

AVAR=""

all : 
    if [ -d ../old ]; then \
    (echo "$@ Ping!"; AVAR="../old"; echo $(AVAR)) \
    fi
    @echo $(AVAR)

The idea is that depending on the presence of directory "../old" i will or not have information in AVAR (available for use later), however, the if is evaluating to true, and the Ping! is echoed, but nothing is assigned to AVAR, either inside or outside the if statement.

Output is as follows:

$ make all
if [ -d ../old ]; then \
        (echo "all Ping!"; AVAR="../old"; echo "") \
        fi
all Ping!

Any Insight appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

Try

(echo "$@ Ping!"; AVAR="../old"; echo $$AVAR) \

instead of

(echo "$@ Ping!"; AVAR="../old"; echo $(AVAR)) \
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Almost, It works for the echo within the if, but not the one outside the if. –  NWS Oct 21 '11 at 13:50
    
Easiest solution? Just chain it on by putting ;\ after fi. –  eriktous Oct 21 '11 at 16:40

1) Each command in a makefile recipe runs in its own subshell. You define AVAR in the first command (the "if" statement), so it's not available to the second command (@echo $(AVAR)).

2) Within the first command, you define AVAR, but you don't call it right. The term $(AVAR) is Make syntax; Make expands it before executing the command, and since Make doesn't know anything about such a variable, it expands to nothing. You have to use the shell to expand it, using shell syntax: $AVAR. But if you try that, Make will expand the $A to nothing, and you'll get "VAR". So you "escape" the $ with another $:

all : 
    if [ -d ../old ]; then \
    (echo "$@ Ping!"; AVAR="../old"; echo $$AVAR) \
    fi
share|improve this answer
    
Almost, It works for the echo within the if, but not the one outside the if. –  NWS Oct 21 '11 at 13:53
    
@NWS, As I said in 1), the value you assign in one command is not available in another. Do you want to use the value again in the same rule (all), or in a different rule? –  Beta Oct 21 '11 at 13:57
    
"available for use later" - i assumed this meant within this rule, and when other rules are evaluated later, which is why i declared AVAR before the rule definition(s). –  NWS Oct 21 '11 at 14:01
    
@NWS, Make doesn't work that way, but there are ways... Is that directory ../old built or removed by Make? That is, does its existence depend on what rules have already been run? –  Beta Oct 21 '11 at 14:13
    
Its existance does not depend on any rules that have been run. I will be wanting to add "old" or another known directory to an include path, depending on their presence or not. –  NWS Oct 21 '11 at 14:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Problem solved, Did the very bad recursive make option to redefine stuff and reinterpret.

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