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I have the following code in the WPF application

if (panel != null)
{
     IList listOfValues = new ComparableListOfObjects();
        var childControls = panel.GetChildren<Control>(x => x.Visibility == Visibility.Visible);
 foreach (Control childControl in childControls)
 {
    var textBox = childControl as TextBox;
    if (textBox != null)
    {
        listOfValues.Add(textBox.Text);
        continue;
    }

    var comboBox = childControl as ComboBox;
    if (comboBox != null)
    {
        listOfValues.Add(comboBox.SelectedItem);
        continue;
    }

    var datePicker = childControl as DatePicker;
    if (datePicker != null)
    {
        listOfValues.Add(datePicker.SelectedDate.GetValueOrDefault());
        continue;
    }
    var numericBox = childControl as NumericUpDown;
    if (numericBox != null)
    {
        listOfValues.Add(numericBox.Value);
        continue;
    }

}

What is the best approach to refactor this code with repetition the same logic for extract value from different controls like?

        var numericBox = childControl as NumericUpDown;
    if (numericBox != null)
    {
        listOfValues.Add(numericBox.Value);
        continue;
    }

In the same class in other method there is the same code

        private static object GetControlValue(Control control)
    {
        if (control == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("control");

        var textBox = control as TextBox;
        if (textBox != null)
            return textBox.Text;

        var comboBox = control as ComboBox;
        if (comboBox != null)
            return comboBox.SelectedValue;

        var datePicker = control as DatePicker;
        if (datePicker != null)
            return datePicker.SelectedDate.GetValueOrDefault();

        var numericUpDown = control as NumericUpDown;
        if (numericUpDown != null)
            return numericUpDown.Value;

        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

May by I should use the strategy design pattern but in this case I need to create additional classes for each type of control?

Could you suggest me better solotion for this prolem? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
Have a look at: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Ray Oct 21 '11 at 13:15
    
@Ray Thank you for suggestion –  Serghei Oct 21 '11 at 13:17
1  
If it was a more complex logic, I would probably suggest something like a ChainOfResponsibility but in that case a cast would do. You can change this statement var childControls = panel.GetChildren<Control>(x => x.Visibility == Visibility.Visible); for a select statement with type and then have a helper class with lots of methods for each control –  Yurii Hohan Oct 21 '11 at 13:23
    
as far as i can tell the way i suggested below is as close as you can get to "removing" them (you don't, in fact...). The only alternative I see is writing a wrapper object with lots of code to map the field you want to extract and the inner property of each of them. lots of Reflection needed for this. –  Alex Oct 21 '11 at 13:40
1  
Check this Something similar to what Tomas Petricek thread –  s_nair Oct 21 '11 at 13:54

5 Answers 5

Having if and switch statements are not a bad thing. Even doing some rudimentary type checking is not necessarily a bad thing, particularly when the types in use can't be used polymorphically. Having that logic expressed more than once is what is frowned upon, because you are repeating yourself, and you have multiple maintenance points for the same change.

In your original code snippet, you do

var blah = obj as Foo;
if (blah != null)
{
    someList.Add(blah.Value); 
}

And repeat this for several more control types. But then in your private method later, you have basically the same logic expressed the same number of times.

var blah = obj as Foo;
if (blah != null)
    return blah.Value;

The only difference is that in the first snippet, you take the value and add it to the list. In the second, you return the value. The first snippet should do away with its type-checking logic, it should use the logic already expressed in the other method.

foreach (var control in childControls)
{
    listOfValues.Add(GetControlValue(control));
}

The idea is don't repeat yourself. DRY.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answer, in this case the method GetControlValue throw an Exception if cannot cast to appropriate type of control, but when we loop in childControls collection this collection can has controls that is cannot cast, for example ScrollViewer and we don't need to throw an exception, simply skip this control. How will be in this case? –  Serghei Oct 24 '11 at 10:55
1  
@Serghei, in that case, I would refactor and separate the exception throwing mechanism from the value finding mechanism. Calls that need an exception to happen can invoke X(), and X invokes Y(). Callers that do not need exceptions can directly invoke Y(). X() would throw an exception, but delegate the value-finding logic itself to Y(), which could return null for unsupported control types. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 24 '11 at 14:27
    
thanks for answer, idea is clear, but if the value of property also will be null and method Y() can return null and if control type not supported or the value of property is null how do resolve this problem? –  Serghei Oct 25 '11 at 7:49
    
@Serghei, that's a different wrinkle, I'll grant that. Here's what I might do. Might be a bad idea, sort of flying by the seat of my pants here. Pass in a Func<object> for the default action when the control is not supported. For places where you don't care when the control isn't supported, it could be () => null, and for places where you do, it could be () => { throw new NotSupportedException(); }. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 26 '11 at 3:16
    
So it would be a method public object GetControlValue(Control control, Func<object> defaultValueProvider), and then have two paths into it, an apathetic getter and a validating getter. The idea is that once the method has exhausted all of the supported control types, it would invoke the callback via return defaultValueProvider();. It would support returning nulls as legitimate values of supported controls, while also allowing you to ignore unsupported controls, or optionally throw an exception. –  Anthony Pegram Oct 26 '11 at 3:16

I believe you are looking for Visitor pattern. One class per controller is one way to do it but to quote the referenced article:

Note: A more flexible approach to this pattern is to create a wrapper class implementing the interface defining the accept method. The wrapper contains a reference pointing to the CarElement which could be initialized through the constructor. This approach avoids having to implement an interface on each element. [see article Java Tip 98 article below]

You might be able to get away with this.

share|improve this answer
    
I cannot imagine how you gonna apply it in that case. Some code sample, please –  Yurii Hohan Oct 21 '11 at 13:33
    
@Hohhi haven't worked out the details. The pattern "allows one to add new virtual functions to a family of classes without modifying the classes themselves". OP Is basically looking to add a virtual function GetControlValue to Control classes. –  Miserable Variable Oct 21 '11 at 13:41
    
The pattern is about traversing something IMHO or I do not know all its aplications. It abstracts out the operations done on visit from the way you visit –  Yurii Hohan Oct 21 '11 at 13:43

Bit of a hack, but here's a way to use delegates and collection-initializers to eliminate the redundancy (you may prefer not to use this as is, but rather the idea).

First create a class like this:

// Needs argument validation. Also, extending Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
// probably isn't a great idea.
public class ByTypeEvaluator : Dictionary<Type, Func<object, object>>
{
    public void Add<T>(Func<T, object> selector)
    {
        Add(typeof(T), x => selector((T)x));
    }

    public object Evaluate(object key)
    {
        return this[key.GetType()](key);
    }
}

And then the usage becomes:

// Give this variable longer lifetime if you prefer.
var map = new ByTypeEvaluator
{
    (ComboBox c) => c.SelectedItem,
    (TextBox t) => t.Text,
    (DateTimePicker dtp) => dtp.Value,
    (NumericUpDown nud) => nud.Value
};

Control myControl = ...
var myProjection = map.Evaluate(myControl); 
share|improve this answer
    
You... Are extremely smart. But man, is that really simpler than just handling those four controls by hand? :) –  Brian MacKay Oct 21 '11 at 14:11

You could do it as a case select in a generic method, but there is still some work with this style:

public static string GetValue<T>(T obj) where T:Control
        {
            switch (obj.GetType().ToString())
            {
                case "TextBox":
                    return (obj as TextBox).Text;
                    break;
                case "ComboBox":
                    return (obj as ComboBox).SelectedValue.ToString();
                    break;

                    //..etc...
            }   
        }
share|improve this answer

you could use an approach like this, relying on is :

private static object GetControlValue(Control control)
{
    if (control == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("control");

    if (control is TextBox) return (control as TextBox).Text;
    if (control is ComboBox) return (control as ComboBox).SelectedValue;

...
}

and

if (panel != null)
{
    IList listOfValues = new ComparableListOfObjects();
    var childControls = panel.GetChildren<Control>(x => x.Visibility == Visibility.Visible);
    foreach (Control childControl in childControls)
    {
    if(childControl is TextBox) { listOfValues.Add((childControl as TextBox).Text);     continue; }
    if(childControl is ComboBox) { listOfValues.Add((childControl as ComboBox).SelectedValue); continue; }

    ... 

    }
}

the continue in the second block is probably not even needed but that requires some testing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thaks for answer but the duplication for if (control is Class name) doesn't removed. –  Serghei Oct 21 '11 at 13:26
    
see my comment under the question itself for details –  Alex Oct 21 '11 at 13:38

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