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I need your help. I am extracting data from XML using XSLT 2.0. The data has long lines and I want to fit them into window size by automatically breaking lines. Is it possible in XSLT? I tried finding on google, got very few results which I didn't understand. Can anyone please help me.

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1  
What is your target format (i.e. xsl:output method)? If that is HTML or XHTML then browsers will ensure that content does not overflow so I don't think you need to do anything. And of course XSLT itself does not know anything about windows or window size, it transforms XML into text or (X)HTML or other XML. –  Martin Honnen Oct 21 '11 at 13:51
    
@MartinHonnen My XML output is text and not XHTML. Is it possible if I output it in text format? –  smandape Oct 21 '11 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the standard XSLT 2.0 function unparsed-text() to read a text file directly in your XSLT 2.0 code.

Then just use:

replace(concat(normalize-space($text),' '),
                '(.{0,60}) ',
                '$1
')

Explanation:

This first normalizes the white space, deleting the leading and trailing sequences of whitespace-only characters and replacing any inner such sequence with a single space.

Then the result of the normalization is used as the first argument to the standard XPath 2.0 function replace().

The match pattern is any (longest possible sequence of maximum 61 characters that ends with a space.

The replacement argument specifies that any such sequence found should be replaced by the string before the ending space, concatenated with a NL character.

Here is a complete solution, reading and formatting this text from the file C:\temp\delete\text.txt:

Dec. 13 — As always for a presidential inaugural, security and surveillance were
extremely tight in Washington, DC, last January. But as George W. Bush prepared to
take the oath of office, security planners installed an extra layer of protection: a
prototype software system to detect a biological attack. The U.S. Department of
Defense, together with regional health and emergency-planning agencies, distributed
a special patient-query sheet to military clinics, civilian hospitals and even aid
stations along the parade route and at the inaugural balls. Software quickly
analyzed complaints of seven key symptoms — from rashes to sore throats — for
patterns that might indicate the early stages of a bio-attack. There was a brief
scare: the system noticed a surge in flulike symptoms at military clinics.
Thankfully, tests confirmed it was just that — the flu.

The XSLT code:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vText" select=
 "unparsed-text('file:///c:/temp/delete/text.txt')"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:sequence select=
   "replace(concat(normalize-space($vText),' '),
            '(.{0,60}) ',
            '$1&#xA;')
   "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

The result is a set of lines, each of which doesn't exceed a fixed length of 60:

Dec. 13 — As always for a presidential inaugural, security
and surveillance were extremely tight in Washington, DC,
last January. But as George W. Bush prepared to take the
oath of office, security planners installed an extra layer
of protection: a prototype software system to detect a
biological attack. The U.S. Department of Defense, together
with regional health and emergency-planning agencies,
distributed a special patient-query sheet to military
clinics, civilian hospitals and even aid stations along the
parade route and at the inaugural balls. Software quickly
analyzed complaints of seven key symptoms — from rashes to
sore throats — for patterns that might indicate the early
stages of a bio-attack. There was a brief scare: the system
noticed a surge in flulike symptoms at military clinics.
Thankfully, tests confirmed it was just that — the flu.

Update:

In case the text comes from an XML file, this can be done with a minimal change to the above solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:sequence select=
   "replace(concat(normalize-space(text),' '),
            '(.{0,60}) ',
            '$1&#xA;')
   "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Here I suppose that all the text is in the only text node child of the top element (named text) of the XML document:

<text>
Dec. 13 — As always for a presidential inaugural, security and surveillance were
extremely tight in Washington, DC, last January. But as George W. Bush prepared to
take the oath of office, security planners installed an extra layer of protection: a
prototype software system to detect a biological attack. The U.S. Department of
Defense, together with regional health and emergency-planning agencies, distributed
a special patient-query sheet to military clinics, civilian hospitals and even aid
stations along the parade route and at the inaugural balls. Software quickly
analyzed complaints of seven key symptoms — from rashes to sore throats — for
patterns that might indicate the early stages of a bio-attack. There was a brief
scare: the system noticed a surge in flulike symptoms at military clinics.
Thankfully, tests confirmed it was just that — the flu.
</text>

When this transformation is applied to the XML document above, the same result as with the first solution is produced.

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1  
+1 for helpful answer. Note that OP was extracting data from an XML file. –  LarsH Oct 22 '11 at 1:55
    
@LarsH: Oh, thanks, I had somehow just the opposite impression -- that he wanted to deal with a plain text file. I'll add the XML file variant to the solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 22 '11 at 1:58
    
Wallah! This really helps. Thank you guys. –  smandape Oct 24 '11 at 13:47
    
@smandape: You are welcome. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 24 '11 at 14:28

I would imagine that tokenize() or <xsl:analyze-string> could be used to do this efficiently, using a regexp that allows up to (say) 70 characters, and ends with a breaking character (e.g. space).

For explicit code, see the XPath and XSLT answers at xquery word wrap.

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2  
+1 for a good summarizing answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 22 '11 at 1:58

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