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I would like Wordpress query to have a foreach in it.

$aid=0;
    foreach ($QA as $key => $value) {
    AND wp_postmeta.post_id IN (
        SELECT wp_postmeta.post_id
        FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
        WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
        AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
        AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = '$key'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = '$value'
    )
    $aid++;
}

But it's not working that way, so I'm asking for help -

How I can put foreach in sql query?

Full example of code below.

<?php
 function query_products($QA) {

global $wpdb;
global $post;
global $pageposts;

$querystr = "

SELECT wp_posts.*, wp_postmeta.*
FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'country'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = 'Denmark'

$aid=0;
    foreach ($QA as $key => $value) {
    AND wp_postmeta.post_id IN (
        SELECT wp_postmeta.post_id
        FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
        WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
        AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
        AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = '$key'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = '$value'
    )
    $aid++;
}

ORDER BY wp_postmeta.meta_value ASC 
    ";

$pageposts = $wpdb->get_results($querystr, OBJECT);

}

$QA = array (
    'key1' => 'value1',
    'key2' => 'value2',
    'key3' => 'value3',
);
query_products($QA);
?>
share|improve this question
    
Can you explain what would be the purpose of such a thing? –  kevin Oct 21 '11 at 14:19
    
Yes. That would loop over Wordpress posts, dynamically filtering them by multiple meta values. –  Gundars Mēness Oct 21 '11 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
$querystr = "
SELECT wp_posts.*, wp_postmeta.*
FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'country'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = 'Denmark'
";

$aid=0;
    foreach ($QA as $key => $value) {
       $querystr .= "
    AND wp_postmeta.post_id IN (
        SELECT wp_postmeta.post_id
        FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
        WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
        AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
        AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = '$key'
        AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = '$value'";
    )
    $aid++;
}
$querystr .=" ORDER BY wp_postmeta.meta_value ASC";
share|improve this answer
    
.= operator for string concatenation. –  Tom Medley Oct 21 '11 at 14:33

Without knowing what the query is supposed to accomplish, I can only suggest something like this:

<?php

$querystr = "
SELECT wp_posts.*, wp_postmeta.*
FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_key = 'country'
AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = 'Denmark'
AND wp_postmeta.post_id IN (
    SELECT wp_postmeta.post_id
    FROM wp_postmeta, wp_posts
    WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta.post_id
    AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
    AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
";
if (count($QA) >= 1) {
    $querystr .= " AND ( ";
    foreach($QA as $key => $value) {
        $querystr .= "(wp_postmeta.meta_key = '{$key}' AND wp_postmeta.meta_value = '{$value}') OR ";
    }
    // get rid of the last "OR" in the string
    $querystr = substr($querystr,0,strrpos($querystr,"OR"));
    $querystr .= " ) ";
}
$querystr .= " ORDER BY wp_postmeta.meta_value ASC ";

?>

Note I used "OR" above because you'll never get any results when checking a single field for multiple values using an "AND" clause.

share|improve this answer

You need to pass all the keys in as an array or issue the full query iteratively (including the select). I would not recommend the latter, because performance will be poor (excessive database round trips are bad). So, I'd do something like this as long as $QA is not too huge. I believe it to be a little bit simpler than the full subquery originally submitted by using an EXISTS clause, but this may be more a matter of taste than one truly being better than the other.

<?php
 function query_products($QA) {

global $wpdb;
global $post;
global $pageposts;

    $querystr = "
    SELECT wp_posts.*, wp_postmeta_a.*
    FROM wp_postmeta AS wp_postmeta_a, wp_posts, wp_postmeta AS wp_postmeta_b
    WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta_a.post_id
    AND wp_posts.post_status = 'publish'
    AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post'
    AND wp_postmeta_a.meta_key = 'country'
    AND wp_postmeta_a.meta_value = 'Denmark'
    ";

    $aid=0;
    foreach ($QA as $key => $value) {
        $querystr .= "
            AND EXISTS (SELECT 1
                    FROM wp_postmeta AS wp_postmeta_b
                    WHERE wp_posts.ID = wp_postmeta_b.post_id
                    AND wp_postmeta_b.meta_key = '$key'
                    AND wp_postmeta_b.meta_value = '$value')
        ";

        $aid++;
    }

    $querystr .= " ORDER BY wp_postmeta_a.meta_value ASC ";


    $pageposts = $wpdb->get_results($querystr, OBJECT);

}

$QA = array (
    'key1' => 'value1',
    'key2' => 'value2',
    'key3' => 'value3',
);
query_products($QA);
?>
share|improve this answer

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