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This involves HTML + JS and/or JQuery:

I would have commented on the previous post, but I don't have comment reputation or cannot comment for some reason.

Josh Stodola's great code from Part I is as follows:

$(function() {
  var txt = $("#myTextbox");
  var func = function() {
    txt.val(txt.val().replace(/\s/g, ''));
  }
  txt.keyup(func).blur(func);
});

This works great except .replace puts the cursor at the end of the string on every keyup (at least in IE8 and Chrome). As a result, it renders the left & right cursor keys useless, which is needed inside the input box.

Is there any way to enhance the above code so that the cursor keys do not activate it, but so that the text still gets updated on the fly?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try:

$(function() {
  var txt = $("#myTextbox");
  var func = function(e) {
    if(e.keyCode != "37" && e.keyCode != "38" && e.keyCode != "39" && e.keyCode != "40"){
        txt.val(txt.val().replace(/\s/g, ''));
    }
  }
  txt.keyup(func).blur(func);
});
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If I do an alert(e.keycode) inside func, I am getting an alert of undefined....suggestions? –  Cymbals Oct 21 '11 at 19:22
    
did you put e inside the function call to be function(e)? –  Richard Edwards Oct 21 '11 at 19:36
    
like this at the end of the outer function? txt.keyup(func(e)).blur(func(e)); –  Cymbals Oct 21 '11 at 19:49
    
Nah, this line: "var func = function(e) {", see if you can alert(e) –  Richard Edwards Oct 21 '11 at 19:51
    
ahhh. it is keyCode and not keycode. Edited to reflect that. –  Cymbals Feb 24 '12 at 16:12

The best solution is to avoid using key events to capture text input. They're not the best tool for the job. Instead, you should use the HTML5 oninput event (supported in the latest and recent versions of every current major browser) and fall back to onpropertychange for older versions of Internet Explorer:

var alreadyHandled;
txt.bind("input propertychange", function (evt) {
    // return if the value hasn't changed or we've already handled oninput
    if (evt.type == "propertychange" && (window.event.propertyName != "value" 
                                                           || alreadyHandled)) {
        alreadyHandled = false;
        return;
    }
    alreadyHandled = true;
    // Your code here
});

These events don't fire for keys that don't result in text entry — don't you just hate it when you shift-tab back to a form element and the resulting keyup event causes the page's script to move focus forward again?

Additional benefits over key events:

  • They fire immediately when the key is pressed and not when the key is lifted, as in keyup. This means you don't get a visual delay before any adjustments to the text are made.
  • They capture other forms of text input like dragging & droppping, spell checker corrections and cut/pasting.

Further reading at Effectively detecting user input in JavaScript.

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This is a great concept, but it looks like it dies at [code] if (evt.type == "propertychange" && window.event.propertyName != "value" || alreadyHandled) return; [/code] –  Cymbals Oct 21 '11 at 16:01
    
@Cymbals: sorry I got distracted whilst writing the answer. tis fixed now. –  Andy E Oct 21 '11 at 16:57
    
Ok, the variable is now declared (I should have caught that). It works once, then the cursor keys act as before. I'm close, and am guessing it has to do with alreadyHandled. –  Cymbals Oct 21 '11 at 19:24
    
I have combined your answer with Richard's below, since for some reason the event only fires once. –  Cymbals Feb 24 '12 at 16:27

Update the function:

  var func = function(e) {
    if(e.keyCode !== 37 && e.keyCode !== 38 && e.keyCode !== 39 && e.keyCode !== 40){
        txt.val(txt.val().replace(/\s/g, ''));
    }
  }
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1  
change the != to !== and you have my vote =) –  jbabey Oct 21 '11 at 15:27
    
The problem with coding in several languages ;) –  Tim Oct 21 '11 at 19:10
$(function() {
  var txt = $("#myTextbox");
  var func = function() {
    txt.val(txt.val().replace(/\s/g, ''));
  }
  txt.keyup(function(evt){
    if(evt.keyCode < 37 || evt.keyCode > 40) {
      func;
    }
  }).blur(func);
});

Something like that should do it. It will run the function if the keycode isn't 37,38,39 or 40 (the four arrow key keycodes). Note that it won't actually stop the cursor position moving to the end when any other key is pressed. For that, you'd need to keep track of the current cursor position. Take a look at this link for jCaret plugin, which can do this

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Very good point on the cursor moving to the end after .replace. Luckily this should not be an issue. I am also dealing with input value that is pasted, or the input is filled via voice and has spaces. –  Cymbals Oct 21 '11 at 21:47

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