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I have a value like this:

421.18834

And I have to round it mathematical correctly with a mask which can look like this:

0.05
0.04
0.1

For example, if the mask is 0.04, i have to get the value 421.20, because .18 is nearer at .20 than .16.

All functions that I found using Google didn't work.

Can you please help me?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
double initial = 421.18834;
double range = 0.04;

int factor = Math.round(initial / range); // 10530 - will round to correct value

double result = factor * range; // 421.20
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1  
should this (int)(initial / range) round correctly? As i saw a few months ago, this just cuts the decimals off instead of rounding (same in PHP, i guess). If I use Math.round, it works. –  Florian Müller Oct 21 '11 at 15:54
    
Well spotted, my Java's a bit rusty :-) But Math.round() will do it correctly! –  Tom Medley Oct 21 '11 at 15:54

You don't need a special function. You multiply your original number by (1/mask), you round it to a decimal and you divide again by the same factor.

  • Example with 0.05

    factor = 1/0.05 = 20
    421.18834 * 20 =  8423.7668
    int(  8423.7668 ) = 8424
    8424.0 / 20.0 = 421.20
    
  • Example with 0.01

    factor = 1/0.1 = 10
    421.18834 * 10 = 4211.8834
    int( 4211.8834 ) = 4212
    4212.0 / 10.0 = 421.20
    
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2  
Caution: In Java, 4212 / 10 does not produce 421.20! –  Tom Medley Oct 21 '11 at 15:30

Both fredley and Matteo make the assumption that the rounding factor is itself a factor of 100. For factors like 0.06 or 0.07, this is an incorrect assumption.

Here's my Java routine:

public double rounded(double number, double factor) {
    long integer = (long) number;
    double fraction = number - integer;
    double multiple = (fraction / factor);
    multiple = Math.round(multiple);
    return factor * multiple + integer;
} 
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Contrary to all the answers you will probably get here about multiplying and dividing, you can't do this accurately because floating point doesn't have decimal places. To need to convert to a decimal radix and then round. BigDecimal does that.

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