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Is there any built-in way to attach an instance variable to a record? For example, suppose I have a User class with a foo attr_accessor:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  attr_accessor :foo
end

If I do

u = User.first
u.foo = "bar"
u.foo # -> "bar"
User.find(1).foo # => nil

This is the correct behavior and I understand why: the instance variable exists for the instance (in memory) and not for the record. What I want is something like a record variable, so that in the above example u.foo and User.find(1).foo return the same value within the same instance of my application. I don't want persistence: it's not appropriate for foo to be a column in the table, it's just appropriate for foo to return the same value for the same record during the life cycle of e.g., a controller action, console session, etc. Nor do I want a class variable via cattr_accessor, because there's no reason that User.find(1).foo should be the same as User.find(2).foo.

The best bet I can come up with is to fake it with a class variable array and instance methods to get/set the appropriate element of the array:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  cattr_accessor :all_the_foos
  self.all_the_foos = Array.new

  def foo
    self.all_the_foos[id]
  end

  def foo= new_foo
    self.all_the_foos[id] = new_foo
  end

end

This ALMOST works, but it doesn't work with un-saved records, e.g. User.new.foo = "bar" fails.

share|improve this question
    
I guess it's hard to answer this without knowing what kind of value you want to store. You say you "don't want persistence" but it sounds like you want the instance to keep the same value from one request/session/week to the next, which is the very definition of "persistence." Can you give us some more clues what you're after here? –  Jordan Oct 21 '11 at 15:48
    
The value will be an instance of another class. I want persistence for a length of time somewhere between that of a regular instance variable and a class variable. So, for example, if I triggered a sequence of actions from a controller action, the value would be consistent, but it need not retain its value after the action is complete. It's not a controller variable, that's just an example. I'd rather not go into the specifics of the context b/c it's relatively complex. I'm pretty convinced that the question I've asked is exactly what I need to know. –  dantswain Oct 21 '11 at 17:09
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use Thread.current to set variables that are active within the context of a controller action invocation. Your current implementation doesn't guarantee context reset across calls.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  after_create    :set_thread_var

  def foo
    new_record? ? @foo : Thread.current["User-foo-#{id}"]
  end

  def foo=(val)
    new_record? ? (@foo = val) : (Thread.current["User-foo-#{id}"] = val)
  end

private

  def set_thread_var
    Thread.current["User-foo-#{id}"] = @foo if defined?(@foo)
  end

end
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and Thanks. I had to drop the attr_accessor, though, because otherwise my foo and foo= methods were ignored. I need to read up on Thread.current to really understand what the lifetime is, but this exactly solved my problem. –  dantswain Oct 22 '11 at 14:55
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I can't think of a better idea than your class variable solution. To solve your "new" problem I'd use after_initialize.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_initialize :init_foos

  cattr_accessor :all_the_foos

  def foo
    self.all_the_foos[id]
  end

  def foo= new_foo
    self.all_the_foos[id] = new_foo
  end

  private
  def init_foos
    @@all_the_foos ||= []
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
+1 and Thanks. I went with @KandadaBoggu's solution because it's explicitly thread-safe and it doesn't create an array of length N when you access User.last.foo (which was my fault). –  dantswain Oct 22 '11 at 14:51
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