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I'm very new to .NET world, I have a small console project (really small) that basically just reference an .DLL created in delphi (where most of the important code is), on my C# code I just have loops, thread sleep instructions and things like that.

My customers is using Microsoft Windows XP SP2, Microsoft XP SP3, Microsoft Windows Vista and Microsoft 7. I want to generate the .EXE in a way to run on all these environments. On my development environment with C# 2010 I have .NET framework 4.0, but I guess that some desktops at my customer has frameworks 3.5 and maybe older. Based on this situation, what is the best option to create the most portable EXE among new and old versions of .NET?

Detailed answer is very welcome since I'm beginner.

Since it may be my simple code, I'm pasting it here.

    using System;
    using System.Reflection;
    using System.Threading;
    using System.Web;
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using Redemption;

    namespace test{

class Program
{

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {


        RedemptionLoader.DllLocation64Bit = @"redemption64.dll";
        RedemptionLoader.DllLocation32Bit = @"redemption.dll";

        var ToEmailAddress = args[0];
        var subject = args[1];
        var pathFileAttach = args[2];

        SendMail(ToEmailAddress, subject, pathFileAttach);

    }

    private static void SendMail(string ToMail,string subject,string filePath) 
    {
        var session = new RDOSession();

        try
        {

            session.Logon();

            if (session.LoggedOn)
            {

                var Drafts = session.GetDefaultFolder(rdoDefaultFolders.olFolderDrafts);

                RDOMail msg = Drafts.Items.Add("IPM.Note");

                var body = "Test Redemption.";

                msg.To = ToMail;
                msg.Recipients.ResolveAll();
                msg.Subject = subject;
                msg.Body = body;

                msg.Attachments.Add(filePath);

                msg.Save();
                msg.Send();

                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            session.Logoff();
            session = null;
        }
    }

}
}
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1  
Some of those versions of Windows don't have any version of the framework installed by default. –  Joe Oct 21 '11 at 16:24
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6 Answers

Develop and build against .net 2.0 as the Target Framework and it will be compatible with all versions going forward.

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1  
Hi ChrisBint. But how to do it? I have to remove the .NET framework 4 and install the old 2.0 and just compile again? Thanks –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:23
    
No, just change the target framework for the project. –  ChrisBint Oct 21 '11 at 16:24
    
Just change the target framework under build options –  Henrik Oct 21 '11 at 16:24
1  
I still occasionally bump into users that only have .NET 1.1 installed. That being said, the difference between 1.1 and 2.0 is enormous, so I think you're right about targeting 2.0. –  MusiGenesis Oct 21 '11 at 16:29
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:41
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In the project menu you may select the version of .net you wish to use (use 2.0 as Chris said). Be careful, however, because sometimes by doing this, things may require some adjusting.

See here for a list of changes that may be important to you

It's also worth noting that under your project properties you may select what dependencies are required to run your application. It will check and allow the user to obtain these dependencies, such as a certain version of the framework, before allowing the install to progress.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:41
    
Try re-adding the dlls to your reference folder on the right hand side of your application. If the problem persists, you may want to start a new question to troubleshoot that and provide a screenshot to help us out. –  KreepN Oct 21 '11 at 16:53
    
Hi KreepN. I clicked in add references, and at browse I added Redemption.dll and Redemption64.dll, but I still get the error. Based on most experienced developers I believe it may be a issue with my code. I attached it on my main post. Can you please take a look and let me know what you think? Thanks. –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 17:17
    
As long as you have the references added under the References section of your project they should work fine, but that code where you say @"redemption64.dll"; is not a valid location. It's expecting a file path. You should be able to remove those two lines. If not, then you just need to correct the path itself. –  KreepN Oct 21 '11 at 17:28
    
KreepN. Humm... but if the file path is incorrect, why it works when targeting framework 4.0? I wanted to reference the current folder, because it's where my DLL is located. How should I do in this case? @".redemption64.dll"; ? @".\redemption64.dll";? Thanks again for your help. –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 17:30
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Be aware that v1.0 and 1.1 of the .NET Framework are extremely difficult to ensure compatibility with. Although all version of the .NET Framework are technically backwards-compatible, 1.0/1.1 are first very basic (they don't even have generic types), and second there were certain language and implementation details that changed significantly when v2.0 was released that actually may not be compatible with a post-2.0 framework. It was highly recommended by Microsoft that all .NET 1.1. programs be recompiled to target 2.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. However the code works perfectly when I target .NET 4.0 Client Profile. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? Also, what is the file it generate named myproject.vshost.exe? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:44
    
Having the Framework 4.0 installed should allow you to run apps targeting any framework from 2.0 on. However, you may need to make sure that your app knows this. In the App.Config, you can specify which versions your app can try to use if the targeted framework isn't installed, by using SupportedRuntime elements. It may also be an implementation detail as Joe said. –  KeithS Oct 21 '11 at 16:59
    
Hi KeithS. I clicked in add references, and at browse I added Redemption.dll and Redemption64.dll and I also changed my target and I confirmed it's modified on the App.Config - but I still get the error. Based on most experienced developers I believe it may be a issue with my code. I attached it on my main post. Can you please take a look and let me know what you think? Thanks. –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 17:19
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While targeting version 2.0 of the framework is probably a good idea in this case as you've got a fairly simple app, you should also create an installer that will detect which version of .NET the client has installed and install the correct one if required.

There are various ways to do this, but ClickOnce comes as part of Visual Studio and is very easy to set up. It doesn't create a large installation exe as it downloads the required version of .NET from Microsoft when it's run.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:41
add comment

The lower the Framework that you build against, the more portable your application will be. What Framework you can build against depends on what you are using in your code. As noted by someone else, keep in mind that some of those Operating Systems will still require the relevant .NET Framework be installed as it is not included.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. However the code works perfectly when I target .NET 4.0 Client Profile. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? Also, what is the file it generate named myproject.vshost.exe? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:45
add comment

.NET 2.0 is usually consider the framework to use when you want to be universal. Most code samples are written in 2.0. However you need to realize you shouldn't assume .Net is going to be installed by default. Some older machines will have to install it. Very few won't have at least 2.0 by now, but it is not assumption I would make unless your willing to risk having people not be able install your software and not know why. Windows XP does not come with .NET by default.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi. Thanks for help. I did it, changed my target to framrwork 2.0 and even 3.0, but my console application refuse to work with this version. When I execute these versions windows says that the application stopped working. And on the console I see an not handled exception (System.IO.FileNotFoundExecption) and below appear two lines of my code referencing my DLL. My DLL is Redemption to work with Outlook. However the code works perfectly when I target .NET 4.0 Client Profile. Any idea of what is the problem? How to solve it? Also, what is the file it generate named myproject.vshost.exe? –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 16:45
    
Without seeing your code, you are using something the 4.0 acts in one way and in 2.0 it acts differently. I would say just make the end user install 4.0 at this point. vshost.exe is just a file created while running the program in the IDE. –  Joe Tyman Oct 21 '11 at 16:52
    
Hi Joe. I clicked in add references, and at browse I added Redemption.dll and Redemption64.dll and I also changed my target and I confirmed it's modified on the App.Config - but I still get the error. Based on your comment it may be a issue with my code. I attached it on my main post. Can you please take a look and let me know what you think? Thanks. –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 17:19
    
The issue your are mostly having is the file path. You get it from args[2]. Are you sure it is right? Also try not to use var and see if it works. –  Joe Tyman Oct 21 '11 at 17:57
    
Hi Joe. Thanks for answer. I'm sure it's correct, in special because it works with .net framework 4 and I use the same command-line. Also, I changed to a static name and the same problem happens. Any other idea? Thanks –  user1007489 Oct 21 '11 at 19:45
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