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I'm trying to maintain a list of unique models from a variety of queries. Unfortunately, the equals method of our models are not defined, so I couldn't use a hash map easily.

As a quick fix I used the following code:

public void AddUnique(
    List<Model> source,
    List<Model> result)
{
    if (result != null)
    {
        if (result.Count > 0
            && source != null
            && source.Count > 0)
        {
            source.RemoveAll(
                s => result.Contains(
                    r => r.ID == s.ID));
        }

        result.AddRange(source);
    }
}

Unfortunately, this does not work. When I step throught the code, I find that even though I've checked to make sure that there was at least one Model with the same ID in both source and result, the RemoveAll(Predicate<Model>) line does not change the number of items in source. What am I missing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The above code shouldn't even compile, as Contains expects a Model, not a predicate.

You can use Any() instead:

source.RemoveAll(s => result.Any(r => r.ID == s.ID));

This will remove the items from source correctly.

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This is crazy. You're very right, but the code did compile. What in the world is going on here?!? –  Kyle Oct 21 '11 at 17:59
2  
Oh boy. Apparently Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T>, Predicate<T>) is actually an extension method in our libraries with a gigantic freaking bug in it. Thank you so much for making me look into that. –  Kyle Oct 21 '11 at 18:03
1  
Gotta love gigantic freaking bugs. –  phoog Oct 21 '11 at 19:31

I might opt to tackle the problem a different way.

You said you do not have suitable implementations of equality inside the class. Maybe you can't change that. However, you can define an IEqualityComparer<Model> implementation that allows you to specify appropriate Equals and GetHashCode implementations external to the actual Model class itself.

var comparer = new ModelComparer();
var addableModels = newSourceOfModels.Except(modelsThatAlreadyExist, comparer);
// you can then add the result to the existing

Where you might define the comparer as

class ModelComparer : IEqualityComparer<Model>
{
     public bool Equals(Model x, Model y)
     {
         // validations omitted
         return x.ID == y.ID;
     }

     public int GetHashCode(Model m)
     {
         return m.ID.GetHashCode();
     }
}
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source.RemoveAll(source.Where(result.Select(r => r.ID).Contains(source.Select(s => s.ID))));

The goal of this statement is to make two enumerations of IDs, one for source and one for result. It then will return true to the where statement for each of the elements in both enumerations. Then it will remove any elements that return true.

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Your code is removing all the models which are the same between the two lists, not those which have the same ID. Unless they're actually the same instances of the model, it won't work like you're expecting.

Sometimes I use these extension methods for that sort of thing:

public static class CollectionHelper
{
    public static void RemoveWhere<T>(this IList<T> list, Func<T, bool> selector)
    {
        var itemsToRemove = list.Where(selector).ToList();
        foreach (var item in itemsToRemove)
        {
            list.Remove(item);
        }
    }

    public static void RemoveWhere<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, Func<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>, bool> selector)
    {
        var itemsToRemove = dictionary.Where(selector).ToList();
        foreach (var item in itemsToRemove)
        {
            dictionary.Remove(item);
        }
    }
}
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