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What's another more terse way to write the following. Basically it toggles the visibility of 2 button based on a condtion.

$("#myCheckBox").click(function() {
    if (window.console && window.console.log)
        console.log("billing only checked? " + this.checked);
    if (this.checked) {
        $("#btnNext").hide();
        $("#btnFinish").show();
    }
    else {
        $("#btnNext").show();
        $("#btnFinish").hide();
    }
});

Just looking for a more efficient way possibly?

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2  
You'll only get terser ways of writing it, which usually means "harder to read". Leave it as is - it's fine. –  Marc B Oct 21 '11 at 17:36
    
Is button finish hidden to begin with ? Event before clicking the checkbox ? –  aziz punjani Oct 21 '11 at 17:36
    
You should optimize for readability. Why do you think this isn't efficient enough? –  ObscureRobot Oct 21 '11 at 17:37
    
Similar to jQuery hide one div show another –  Richard JP Le Guen Oct 21 '11 at 17:37
1  
Try telling that to your hung-over self at 2AM six months from now when an obscure bug hits the fan. (I've been there. It isn't much fun. Don't make it worse). Note - I'm taking issue with your request for "terse" code, which is often harder to read. A request for a more concise solution would produce more positive results. It is all about the question framing. –  ObscureRobot Oct 21 '11 at 17:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can use .toggle, which accepts an argument indicating whether an element should be shown or hidden:

$("#btnNext").toggle(!this.checked);
$("#btnFinish").toggle(this.checked);

If the visibility is correctly set up from the beginning, you don't even have to pass an argument:

$("#btnNext, #btnFinish").toggle();

I agree with others regarding readability though. .toggle by itself might be still understandable, but .toggle(!this.checked) can become more difficult to comprehend.

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This is a great solution because it increases clarity while reducing code. –  ObscureRobot Oct 21 '11 at 17:44

Use the toggle() function - http://api.jquery.com/toggle/

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You can use .toggle():

$("#myCheckBox").click(function() {
    if (window.console && window.console.log)
        console.log("billing only checked? " + this.checked);
    $("#btnNext").toggle(!this.checked);
    $("#btnFinish").toggle(this.checked);
});
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You can reduce this:

if (this.checked) {
    $("#btnNext").hide();
    $("#btnFinish").show();
}
else {
    $("#btnNext").show();
    $("#btnFinish").hide();
}

to this:

$("#btnNext").toggle(!this.checked);
$("#btnFinish").toggle(this.checked);
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Assuming that they start in the correct show and hide states you can just do the following.

$("#myCheckBox").click(function() {
  if (window.console && window.console.log) {
    console.log("billing only checked? " + this.checked);
  }
  $("#btnNext").toggle();
  $("#btnFinish").toggle();
}
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you can use .toggle() instead of show/hide, then you could get rid of the if/else construct.

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It may not be 100% efficient - I'm sure you can condense this by using a clever ternary or something (Edit: Felix Kling has a nice one already) - but on the other hand, it is perfectly readable this way, even for a person who is not familiar with the project at all.

My tendency would be to leave it as it is.

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