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My current query looks like this:

SELECT DISTINCT (member), count( UID ) AS numUID
FROM memberdata
GROUP BY Member
ORDER BY count( UID ) DESC

What I get back, looks a lot like this:

A name 1    175
A name 2    38
A name 3    37
A name 4    36
A name 5    36

What I want to do now is get the count of numUID, in the above example I may get a result like:

**numUID**   **COUNT**
   175           1
   38            1
   37            1
   36            2

I've searched far and wide, but I can't seem to get the information I need to put this query together properly. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a subselect and another GROUP BY:

SELECT numUID, COUNT(*)
FROM (
    SELECT member, count(UID) AS numUID
    FROM memberdata
    GROUP BY Member
) T1
GROUP BY numUID

I should also warn you that you are also misusing DISTINCT. When you use DISTINCT it always looks at the entire row. Writing DISTINCT(x) , y is exactly the same as DISTINCT x, y. When you use GROUP BY it is guaranteed that you will only get one row per group. There is no need to use DISTINCT here.

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+1 for beating me to the same answer :) –  Jason McCreary Oct 21 '11 at 17:52
    
brilliant, and thanks for the extra info on distinct! –  Kevin Collins Oct 21 '11 at 18:14

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