Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to deserialize JSON into a custom object but all my properties are set to null and not sure what's going on. Does anyone see anything wrong?

JSON Example

{
"Keys": [
    {
        "RegistrationKey": "asdfasdfa",
        "ValidationStatus": "Valid",
        "ValidationDescription": null,
        "Properties": [
            {
                "Key": "Guid",
                "Value": "i0asd23165323sdfs68661358"
            }
        ]
    }
 ]
}

Here is my Code, where strResponseValid is the JSON above.

Keys myDeserializedObjValid = (Keys)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(strResponseValid, typeof(Keys));
validationStatusValid = myDeserializedObjValid.ValidationStatus;

Here are my classes

    public class Keys
    {
        public string RegistrationKey { get; set; }
        public string ValidationStatus { get; set; }
        public string ValidationDescription { get; set; }
        public List<Properties> PropertiesList { get; set; }
    }

    public class Properties
    {
        public string Key { get; set; }
        public string Value { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Which language is this? –  Felix Kling Oct 21 '11 at 18:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your JSON has an outer object which contains a collection of Key objects. The following code works (I tested it):

    class KeyWrapper
    {
        public List<Key> Keys { get; set; }
    }

    class Key
    {
        public string RegistrationKey { get; set; }
        public string ValidationStatus { get; set; }
        public string ValidationDescription { get; set; }
        public List<Properties> Properties { get; set; }
    }

    public class Properties
    {
        public string Key { get; set; }
        public string Value { get; set; }
    }

    public void DeserializeKeys()
    {            
        const string json = @"{""Keys"": 
            [
                {
                    ""RegistrationKey"": ""asdfasdfa"",
                    ""ValidationStatus"": ""Valid"",
                    ""ValidationDescription"": null,
                    ""Properties"": [
                        {
                            ""Key"": ""Guid"",
                            ""Value"": ""i0asd23165323sdfs68661358""
                        }
                    ]
                 }
             ]
         }";

        var keysWrapper = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<KeyWrapper>(json);
 }
share|improve this answer

The problem here is that you're defining Keys as just a class, when it's actually a property.

public class Response
{
    public Keys Keys { get; set; }
}

public class Keys
{
    public string RegistrationKey { get; set; }
    public string ValidationStatus { get; set; }
    public string ValidationDescription { get; set; }
    public List<Properties> PropertiesList { get; set; }
}

public class Properties
{
    public string Key { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

You don't need to define PropertiesList as a list in the class just call the PropertiesList Class as below.

public class Keys
    {
        public string RegistrationKey { get; set; }
        public string ValidationStatus { get; set; }
        public string ValidationDescription { get; set; }
        public PropertiesList  PropertiesList { get; set; }
    }

    public class PropertiesList 
    {
        public string Key { get; set; }
        public string Value { get; set; }
    }

Then try using the following to deserialize:

keys myDeserializedObjValid = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<keys>(strResponseValid);
share|improve this answer

JSON.NET is an opt-in serialization library. The properties in your objects require attributes in order to flag them as being included in the JSON structure.

public class Keys
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "RegistrationKey")]
    public string RegistrationKey { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "ValidationStatus")]
    public string ValidationStatus { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "ValidationDescription")]
    public string ValidationDescription { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "Properties")]
    public List<Properties> PropertiesList { get; set; }
}

public class Properties
{
    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "Key")]
    public string Key { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(PropertyName = "Value")]
    public string Value { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, looking at the structure of your JSON, you'll need one more class to act as the root node and has a "Keys" property that is a collection/array of Key objects. –  Ricky Smith Oct 21 '11 at 19:44
    
I use Json.Net with unmarked properties all the time. Your comment (and @MikeRichards's answer below) appear to be the actual problem. –  Chris Phillips Oct 21 '11 at 22:55
    
You're right. I've always used it as an opt-in library, but that is determined by an attribute on the class. –  Ricky Smith Oct 24 '11 at 17:54
    
that's not true. it's opt out by default ([JsonIgnore] for opt-out) –  Benja Sep 7 '12 at 21:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.