Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a working app and I'm working on converting it to ARC in Xcode 4.2. One of the pre-check warnings involves capturing self strongly in a block leading to a retain cycle. I've made a simple code sample to illustrate the issue. I believe I understand what this means but I'm not sure the "correct" or recommended way to implement this type of scenario.

  • self is an instance of class MyAPI
  • the code below is simplified to show only the interactions with the objects and blocks relevant to my question
  • assume that MyAPI gets data from a remote source and MyDataProcessor works on that data and produces an output
  • the processor is configured with blocks to communicate progress & state

code sample:

// code sample
self.delegate = aDelegate;

self.dataProcessor = [[MyDataProcessor alloc] init];

self.dataProcessor.progress = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [self.delegate myAPI:self isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
};

self.dataProcessor.completion = ^{
    [self.delegate myAPIDidFinish:self];
    self.dataProcessor = nil;
};

// start the processor - processing happens asynchronously and the processor is released in the completion block
[self.dataProcessor startProcessing];

Question: what am I doing "wrong" and/or how should this be modified to conform to ARC conventions?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 374 down vote accepted

Short answer

Instead of accessing self directly, you should access it indirectly, from a reference that will not be retained. If you're not using Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), you can do this:

__block MyDataProcessor *dp = self;
self.progressBlock = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [dp.delegate myAPI:dp isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
}

The __block keyword marks variables that can be modified inside the block (we're not doing that) but also they are not automatically retained when the block is retained (unless you are using ARC). If you do this, you must be sure that nothing else is going to try to execute the block after the MyDataProcessor instance is released. (Given the structure of your code, that shouldn't be a problem.) Read more about __block.

If you are using ARC, the semantics of __block changes and the reference will be retained, in which case you should declare it __weak instead.

Long answer

Let's say you had code like this:

self.progressBlock = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [self.delegate processingWithProgress:percentComplete];
}

The problem here is that self is retaining a reference to the block; meanwhile the block must retain a reference to self in order to fetch its delegate property and send the delegate a method. If everything else in your app releases its reference to this object, its retain count won't be zero (because the block is pointing to it) and the block isn't doing anything wrong (because the object is pointing to it) and so the pair of objects will leak into the heap, occupying memory but forever unreachable without a debugger. Tragic, really.

That case could be easily fixed by doing this instead:

id progressDelegate = self.delegate;
self.progressBlock = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [progressDelegate processingWithProgress:percentComplete];
}

In this code, self is retaining the block, the block is retaining the delegate, and there are no cycles (visible from here; the delegate may retain our object but that's out of our hands right now). This code won't risk a leak in the same way, because the value of the delegate property is captured when the block is created, instead of looked up when it executes. A side effect is that, if you change the delegate after this block is created, the block will still send update messages to the old delegate. Whether that is likely to happen or not depends on your application.

Even if you were cool with that behavior, you still can't use that trick in your case:

self.dataProcessor.progress = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [self.delegate myAPI:self isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
};

Here you are passing self directly to the delegate in the method call, so you have to get it in there somewhere. If you have control over the definition of the block type, the best thing would be to pass the delegate into the block as a parameter:

self.dataProcessor.progress = ^(MyDataProcessor *dp, CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [dp.delegate myAPI:dp isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
};

This solution avoids the retain cycle and always calls the current delegate.

If you can't change the block, you could deal with it. The reason a retain cycle is a warning, not an error, is that they don't necessarily spell doom for your application. If MyDataProcessor is able to release the blocks when the operation is complete, before its parent would try to release it, the cycle will be broken and everything will be cleaned up properly. If you could be sure of this, then the right thing to do would be to use a #pragma to suppress the warnings for that block of code. (Or use a per-file compiler flag. But don't disable the warning for the whole project.)

You could also look into using a similar trick above, declaring a reference weak or unretained and using that in the block. For example:

__weak MyDataProcessor *dp = self; // OK for iOS 5 only
__unsafe_unretained MyDataProcessor *dp = self; // OK for iOS 4.x and up
__block MyDataProcessor *dp = self; // OK if you aren't using ARC
self.progressBlock = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [dp.delegate myAPI:dp isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
}

All three of the above will give you a reference without retaining the result, though they all behave a little bit differently: __weak will try to zero the reference when the object is released; __unsafe_unretained will leave you with an invalid pointer; __block will actually add another level of indirection and allow you to change the value of the reference from within the block (irrelevant in this case, since dp isn't used anywhere else).

What's best will depend on what code you are able to change and what you cannot. But hopefully this has given you some ideas on how to proceed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome answer! Thanks, I have a much better understanding about what is going on and how this all works. In this case, I have control over everything so I'll re-architect some of the objects as needed. –  XJones Oct 21 '11 at 21:18
    
Good answer. I've been using __weak myself in an iOS project. It gives you more safety than __block or __unsafe_unretained, but I imagine most people would be calling this in a situation where self is guaranteed to exist. I also like __weak as a keyword because it is more "explicit" about what's being accomplished, whereas the intentions of __block can be ambiguous. –  mikelikespie Nov 2 '11 at 1:15
8  
O_O I was just passing by with a slightly different problem, got stuck reading, and now leave this page feeling all knowledgeable and cool. Thanks! –  Orc JMR Dec 19 '12 at 8:07
    
is is correct, that if for some reason on the moment of block execution dp will be released (for example if it was a view controller and it was poped), then line [dp.delegate ... will cause EXC_BADACCESS? –  peetonn Jan 30 '13 at 1:50
    
Should the property holding the block (e.g. dataProcess.progress) be strong or weak? –  Daniel Skinner Jun 10 '13 at 10:30
show 5 more comments

There’s also the option to suppress the warning when you are positive that the cycle will get broken in the future:

#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Warc-retain-cycles"

self.progressBlock = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [self.delegate processingWithProgress:percentComplete];
}

#pragma clang diagnostic pop

That way you don’t have to monkey around with __weak, self aliasing and explicit ivar prefixing.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sounds like a very bad practice that takes more than 3 lines of code that can be replaced with __weak id weakSelf = self; –  Andy Sep 3 '13 at 14:05
1  
There’s often a larger block of code that can benefit from the suppressed warnings. –  zoul Sep 3 '13 at 17:56
    
Except that __weak id weakSelf = self; has fundamentally different behavior than suppressing the warning. The question started with "... if you are positive that the retain cycle will get broken" –  Tim Gostony Jan 23 at 21:34
    
And just because you are positive that the cycle will get broken that doesn't mean it will actually happen. Worse, if the cycle gets broken now doesn't mean it gets broken when someone makes some innocent change to the code. Using __weak id weakSelf = self; ends up in code that just works. The pragma can lead to a bug that you will take you ages to find. –  gnasher729 Feb 28 at 9:53
add comment

For a common solution, I have these define in the precompile header. Avoids capturing and still enables compiler help by avoiding to use id

#define BlockWeakObject(o) __typeof(o) __weak
#define BlockWeakSelf BlockWeakObject(self)

Then in code you can do:

BlockWeakSelf weakSelf = self;
self.dataProcessor.completion = ^{
    [weakSelf.delegate myAPIDidFinish:weakSelf];
    weakSelf.dataProcessor = nil;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Avoid using weakSelf multiple times. Someone else could release weakSelf in another thread between any two uses, so the second or third reference might be nil when the first is not. As an example, this could call [weakSelf.delegate myAPIDidFinish:nil]. The correct way is to store weakSelf into a strong variable strongSelf before the first use, so either strongSelf is nil or strongSelf is not nil throughout the block. –  gnasher729 Feb 28 at 9:57
add comment

I believe the solution without ARC also works with ARC, using the __block keyword:

EDIT: Per the Transitioning to ARC Release Notes, an object declared with __block storage is still retained. Use __weak (preferred) or __unsafe_unretained (for backwards compatibility).

// code sample
self.delegate = aDelegate;

self.dataProcessor = [[MyDataProcessor alloc] init];

// Use this inside blocks
__block id myself = self;

self.dataProcessor.progress = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [myself.delegate myAPI:myself isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
};

self.dataProcessor.completion = ^{
    [myself.delegate myAPIDidFinish:myself];
    myself.dataProcessor = nil;
};

// start the processor - processing happens asynchronously and the processor is released in the completion block
[self.dataProcessor startProcessing];
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't realize that the __block keyword avoided retaining it's referent. Thanks! I updated my monolithic answer. :-) –  benzado Oct 21 '11 at 21:41
1  
According to Apple docs "In manual reference counting mode, __block id x; has the effect of not retaining x. In ARC mode, __block id x; defaults to retaining x (just like all other values)." –  XJones Oct 22 '11 at 2:08
    
@XJones Thanks for the clarification, I've edited my answer. –  Tony Oct 24 '11 at 15:09
add comment

If you are sure that your code will not create a retain cycle, or that the cycle will be broken later, then the simplest way to silence the warning is:

// code sample
self.delegate = aDelegate;

self.dataProcessor = [[MyDataProcessor alloc] init];

[self dataProcessor].progress = ^(CGFloat percentComplete) {
    [self.delegate myAPI:self isProcessingWithProgress:percentComplete];
};

[self dataProcessor].completion = ^{
    [self.delegate myAPIDidFinish:self];
    self.dataProcessor = nil;
};

// start the processor - processing happens asynchronously and the processor is released in the completion block
[self.dataProcessor startProcessing];

The reason that this works is that while dot-access of properties is taken into account by Xcode's analysis, and therefore

x.y.z = ^{ block that retains x}

is seen as having a retain by x of y (on the left side of the assignment) and by y of x (on the right side), method calls are not subject to the same analysis, even when they are property-access method calls that are equivalent to dot-access, even when those property access methods are compiler-generated, so in

[x y].z = ^{ block that retains x}

only the right side is seen as creating a retain (by y of x), and no retain cycle warning is generated.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.