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I'm writing a tiny HTTP server using C++ (just for fun).

When receiving request from a client, should I worry about charset of HTTP headers? Is it guaranteed that all of them constist only of one-byte ASCII characters?

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2 Answers 2

up vote -1 down vote accepted

That's a great question and I don't know but would like to. I believe you will find the answer here: http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616.html

That doc says that Headers follow RFC822 (http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc0822.txt) and that one says ASCII. I'm thinking that you can rely upon the ASCIIness of it all.

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It seems that you're right: "Each header field can be viewed as a single, logical line of ASCII characters, comprising a field-name and a field-body." Thanks a lot! –  Maksim Tyutmanov Oct 21 '11 at 20:15
    
"It seems that I was right", yet I get downvoted anyhow....sigh. –  Bob Kuhar Nov 7 '11 at 21:54
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The answer above is incorrect. RFC 2616 mentions RFC 822, but this is not a normative statement, just a reference to a prior, similar format. The ABNF in RFC 2616 makes it clear that you can have octets >= 128. –  Julian Reschke Nov 8 '11 at 10:02

Is it guaranteed that all of them constist only of one-byte ASCII characters?

No. HTTP uses TCP, so octets >= 128 can be transferred.

Does HTTP allow non-ASCII characters?

Yes. See the ABNF for field-content (RFC 2616, Section 4.2) and quoted-string (RFC 2616, Section 2.2).

Does HTTP define the encoding?

More or less, by stating that non-ISO-8859-1 characters require an additional layer of encoding (again, from 2.2):

The TEXT rule is only used for descriptive field contents and values that are not intended to be interpreted by the message parser. Words of *TEXT MAY contain characters from character sets other than ISO-8859-1 [22] only when encoded according to the rules of RFC 2047 [14].

Is this used in practice?

Yes. For instance, in Content-Disposition.

Is this a good idea?

No, because many recipients and intermediates get this wrong.

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I don't get it. According to this doc rfc822 (BNF on the page 9, where CHAR is ASCII character). Do you mean custom headers? –  Maksim Tyutmanov Oct 22 '11 at 11:12
    
Comrade - How is RFC 822 relevant? –  Julian Reschke Nov 3 '11 at 16:28
    
In section 4.2 it calls out RFC 822: w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec4.html#sec4.2 sounds to me like the standard is being ignored. –  Bob Kuhar Nov 7 '11 at 21:57
    
Methinks some reference is in order here. Where have you seen non-ascii chars in headers and what spec are they following such that we can write some code around this. –  Bob Kuhar Nov 7 '11 at 22:05
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Bob: "follow the same generic format" doesn't mean they are the same. RFC 2616 itself defines the format, and it definitely allows code points >= 128. I'm not saying it is a good idea, but it's what the spec says. Re: "Where have you seen non-ascii chars in headers and what spec are they following such that we can write some code around this." - the spec is RFC 2616. Example header fields where I have seen non-ASCII are Content-Disposition (in the Filename parameter) and WWW-Authenticate (in the Realm parameter). –  Julian Reschke Nov 8 '11 at 10:12

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