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Well, maybe the title is misleading a bit. All I want you to do is to take a quick look at the following two snippets and to give me some tips on how to improve the performance as much as possible without getting too exotic code. The code is needed to function on win32 only. Unfortunately STL containers are not an option right now.

To read the file...

bool TextFile::Read(const char *pFilePath)
{
    bool            bSuccess    = false;
    std::ifstream   oFile(pFilePath, std::ios_base::in);

    if(oFile.is_open())
    {
        std::string stLineNow;
        std::size_t siLineLength;

        if(this->pLines)
        {
            this->Clear();
        }

        this->stFilePath = pFilePath;

        oFile.seekg(0, std::ios::end);
        this->pLines = new unsigned char *[static_cast<unsigned int> (oFile.tellg())];
        oFile.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);

        for(this->ulLinesCount = 0; std::getline(oFile, stLineNow).good(); this->ulLinesCount++)
        {
            siLineLength = stLineNow.length() + 1;
            this->pLines[this->ulLinesCount] = new unsigned char[siLineLength];
            memcpy(this->pLines[this->ulLinesCount], stLineNow.c_str(), siLineLength);
        }

        bSuccess = true;

        oFile.close();
    }

    return bSuccess;
}

... and to save it...

bool TextFile::Save(const char *pFilePath)
{
    bool bSuccess = false;

    if(this->pLines)
    {
        std::ofstream oFile(pFilePath ? pFilePath : this->stFilePath, std::ios_base::out);

        if(oFile.is_open())
        {
            for(unsigned long ulPosition = 0; ulPosition < this->GetCount(); ulPosition++)
            {
                oFile << this->Get(ulPosition) << '\n';
            }

            bSuccess = true;

            oFile.close();
        }
    }

    return bSuccess;
}

... and please excuse the ugly formatting.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
codereview.stackexchange.com –  Tom Kerr Oct 21 '11 at 20:44
1  
You seem to allocate too many lines: this->pLines = new unsigned char *[static_cast<unsigned int> (oFile.tellg())]; allocates one line per character in the input file. –  Vlad Oct 21 '11 at 20:46
    
why can't you use stl containers? they are part of the language anyway –  Vlad Oct 21 '11 at 20:48
    
It's all fun a games until someone also wants UTF-16 support. –  user786653 Oct 21 '11 at 21:11
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well... what I would do is:

  • Use memory-mapped files. That's THE fastest way of reading files;
  • Then memcpy() all the file's contents in a new buffer;
  • Then run through the buffer once and count the newlines;
  • Make an array of as many pointers as there are newlines;
  • Run through the buffer another time, and this time:
    • Replace the first byte of each newline with 0.
    • Place a pointer to the start of each line in the pointer array.

Voilà !

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Although my gut feeling would say it will be faster to do a single pass. The pointer array will then need expand/be reallocated over time. For longer lines, this should be more efficient. –  jdv-Jan de Vaan Oct 21 '11 at 20:55
    
Hard to say. Maybe. A suitable data structure then has to be selected for the "expanding array of pointers". That however then depends on the data that needs to be read. Profiling needs to be done too. If a linked list can be used instead of an array, that would be good. –  Vilx- Oct 21 '11 at 20:59
1  
Sounds like a lot of memory allocations. It's a relatively expensive operation, when trying to be fast. That's why I opted for the two-pass approach. Of course, if the whole file consists of 5 enormously huge lines, then your approach will be faster. But I think it's a less likely scenario than a thousand small lines. –  Vilx- Oct 21 '11 at 21:40
1  
Vilx, You're right, of course, your approach is much better afterall. Forgive me, it's late and I'm taking quick breaks inbetween packing up the house :). Oliver K., the easiest approach would be to allocate a buffer 1 byte larger and fix the last character to '\0', I guess. –  arke Oct 21 '11 at 22:59
1  
Well, if they get modified, then it's trickier. If they don't grow longer and new lines aren't created, then you can keep them in the same big buffer, and just write that out, along with a little extra info about how many lines there are and where each line starts (then you can read it in extra fast). But if that isn't the case (which it most likely isn't), then you'll have to write it out line-by-line. If you use the same memory-mapped files again, that should be pretty efficient anyway. Again - you can write extra info about the count of lines and the starting position of each. –  Vilx- Oct 22 '11 at 16:10
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