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Ok, so my task was to modify this code to count both upper and lower case vowels. The point of the program is to demonstrate the use of stack to preserve data across function calls:

##
## vowel.a - prints out number of vowels in  
##         - the string str
##
##  a0 - points to the string
##

#################################################
#                                               #
#                 text segment                  #
#                                               #
#################################################

            .text           
            .globl __start 
   __start:         # execution starts here


            la $a0,str
            jal vcount      # call vcount

            move $a0,$v0
            li $v0,1
            syscall         # print answer


            la $a0,endl
            li $v0,4
            syscall         # print newline

            li $v0,10
            syscall         # au revoir...

           #------------------------------------------------
           # vowelp - takes a single character as a
           # parameter and returns 1 if the character 
           # is a (lower case) vowel otherwise return 0.
           #        a0 - holds character
           #        v0 - returns 0 or 1
           #------------------------------------------------

           vowelp:  li $v0,0
           beq  $a0,'a',yes
           beq  $a0,'e',yes
           beq  $a0,'i',yes
           beq  $a0,'o',yes
           beq  $a0,'u',yes
           jr $ra
           yes:     li $v0,1
           jr $ra


           #------------------------------------------------
           # vcount - use vowelp to count the vowels in a
           # string.
           #        a0 - holds string address
           #        s0 - holds number of vowels
           #        v0 - returns number of vowels
           #------------------------------------------------

           vcount:  
           sub $sp,$sp,16   # save registers on stack
           sw $a0,0($sp)
           sw $s0,4($sp)
           sw $s1,8($sp)
           sw $ra,12($sp)

           li $s0,0 # count of vowels
           move $s1,$a0     # address of string

           nextc:   lb $a0,($s1)    # get each character
           beqz $a0,done    # zero marks end
           jal vowelp       # call vowelp 
           add $s0,$s0,$v0  # add 0 or 1 to count
           add $s1,$s1,1    # move along string
           b nextc
           done:    move $v0,$s0    # use $v0 for result

           lw $a0,0($sp)    # restore registers
           lw $s0,4($sp)
           lw $s1,8($sp)
           lw $ra,12($sp)
           add $sp,$sp,16
           jr $ra


    #################################################
    #                                               #
    #               data segment                    #
    #                                               #
    #################################################


           .data
     str:   .asciiz "long time ago in a galaxy far away"
     endl:  .asciiz "\n"

     ##
     ## end of file vowel.a

my modified code that works:

    ##
    ## vowel.a - prints out number of vowels in  
    ##         - the string str
    ##
    ##      a0 - points to the string
    ##

    #################################################
    #                                               #
    #               text segment                    #
    #                                               #
    #################################################

            .text           
            .globl __start 
    __start:                # execution starts here

            la $a0,str
            jal vcount      # call vcount

            move $a0,$v0
            li $v0,1
            syscall         # print answer

            la $a0,endl
            li $v0,4
            syscall         # print newline

            move $a0,$t0
            li $v0,1
            syscall

            la $a0,endl
            li $v0,4
            syscall

            li $v0,10
            syscall         # au revoir...

            vowell: li $v0,0
            beq  $a0,'a',yes
            beq  $a0,'e',yes
            beq  $a0,'i',yes
            beq  $a0,'o',yes
            beq  $a0,'u',yes
            jr $ra
            yes:    li $v0,1
                    jr $ra
            vowelu:
            li $v0,0
            beq $a0,'A',yes
            beq $a0,'E',yes
            beq $a0,'I',yes
            beq $a0,'O',yes
            beq $a0,'U',yes
                    jr $ra

            vcount:
            sub $sp,$sp,20
            sw $a0,0($sp)
            sw $s0,4($sp)
            sw $s1,8($sp)
            sw $ra,12($sp)
            sw $s2,16($sp)

            li $s0,0
            li $s2,0
            move $s1,$a0

            nextc:
            lb $a0,($s1)
            beqz $a0,done
            jal vowell
            add $s0,$s0,$v0
            jal vowelu
            add $s2,$s2,$v0
            add $s1,$s1,1
            b nextc
            done:
            move $v0,$s0
            move $t0,$s2

            lw $a0,0($sp)
            lw $s0,4($sp)
            lw $s1,8($sp)
            lw $ra,12($sp)
            lw $s2,16($sp)
            add $sp,$sp,20
            jr $ra

            .data
            str:    .asciiz "Long Time Ago in a Galaxy Far Far Away"
            endl:   .asciiz "\n"

I don't understand what the lw block at the end is for. The program stores the count in s0 and t0 respectively, so whats the point? It looks as though its just restoring the original values at the end. Whoop de do was that there just to demonstrate that its possible?

share|improve this question
    
Complaints about the SO engine belong on meta.stackoverflow.com but you can just select the text block, then click the code button at the top of the edit box. Either that, or use a Firefox extension (e.g., It's All Text) to edit your post in gvim. Anyway, I'm going to edit out your complaints about the SO engine (and also fix your formatting a place you missed the spaces...). –  derobert Oct 21 '11 at 20:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not familiar with MIPS assembly, but in general each platform has conventions as to how subroutines are supposed to behave. One of those conventions is usually around which CPU registers a subroutine must preserve. The conventions, taken together, form the ABI.

Think of it this way: When you have a program with only a few subroutines, its easy enough to keep track of "yeah, this routine destroys register X" each time you call it. But as your program grows, that becomes very difficult. Imagine the difficulty of changing a function to use a new register—you'd have to then check each subroutine that calls this routine, to make sure it doesn't rely on the register across the call. And every routine that calls those routines, etc. Change a commonly-used utility function, and you wind up having to verify the entire program; in this way lies madness.

There are two maintainable solutions to this: either the caller saves all registers it is using, or the callee saves all registers it changes. Normally, you'd expect code to get less complex (and use less registers) the further in the call chain you get, so the callee probably has a smaller set to save. Further, the number of function calls normally exceeds the number of functions, so callee saving also produces less code. It looks like MIPS follows this logic, and requires the callee to save the registers. Sometimes, on architectures with a lot of registers (e.g., PowerPC) there are some which are considered "temporary" and thus the callee doesn't have to save them; this is a combination of the two approaches.

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I don't know much about MIPS, but I'm assuming that the idea is similar to x86.

Just from what you said, the last LW is restoring the original values. The reason this occurs is so you can call a function inside of another function (inception style) and not worry about losing variables and values placed on the stack that weren't allocated to memory (things like iterators etc).

For example, lets say you're iterating through a whole page of text taking it one line at a time. You'll store the iterator of the outer loop (the page line) in a register. Now when you enter the function to count the number of vowels, you don't want to worry about losing that value so it gets pushed onto the stack. Your vowel counter will run do what it's supposed to do, use whatever registers it wants, and then when it completes it will (depending on your methodology) restore the values from the stack to their original places. That way the inner function doesn't mess with the outer function and you don't have your registers getting smashed by the called method's functions.

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In the most common MIPS calling convention

  • the temporary registers $t0,$t1,...,$t9 can be destroyed (i.e. changed and not restored) when you call a function.
  • the $s0,$s1,...,$s7 (callee saved) registers must remain unchanged after you call a function. The function you call will typically store the value of the callee saved registers on the stack if it needs to use these registers. The callee saved registers will be restored from the stack right before the function returns.
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