Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This has been driving me nuts for the past hour. I have two computers, one I work on primarily running linux mint 11 and the following version of the JDK:

java version "1.6.0_20"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.9.5) (6b20-1.9.5-0ubuntu1~9.10.1)
OpenJDK Client VM (build 19.0-b09, mixed mode, sharing)

Now on my windows computer I'm trying to use the same code I have compiled and ran on the linux one. The windows one is running XP with the following java:

java version "1.6.0_26"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_26-b03)
Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 20.1-b02, mixed mode, sharing)

I know the versions are different but should that really make a difference with something as simple as a nested class? I really hope I just made a mistake in the following code:

public class test {
    public static class nClass
    {
        public void testFunc()
        {
            System.out.println("Test worked.");
        }
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        test.nClass t = new test.nClass();
        t.testFunc();
    }
}

This code compiles and runs fine on the linux computer. When I bring it over to the windows one it will compile fine but produces:

NoClassDefFoundError test$nClass at test.main(test.java:10)

I'm completely stumped and entirely frustrated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My guess is that you only copied the test.class file - you need to copy test$nClass.class as well... or recompile on Windows.

(Note that these names don't follow Java naming conventions. It's not relevant to the question, but it's a good idea to follow conventions even for sample code.)

share|improve this answer
    
You sir, are a genius. I can't believe it was that easy. –  Andrew Mac Oct 21 '11 at 20:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.