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Serial code snippet looks like this:

int i, j;
for(j=0; j<ny; j++)
{
    for(i=0; i<nx; i++)
    {
        x[i + j*nx] *= y[i];
    }
}

I converted this to CUDA using this kernel:

int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
int i,j;
for(tid = 0; tid <nx*ny; tid++)
{
    j = tid/nx;
    i = tid - j*nx;
    x[tid] *= y[i];
}

However the GPU kernel does not give any speedup improvement? Any suggestions on a better solution?? Thanks in advance

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how long is i, j ? how many blocks did you use in grid? –  Eddy_Screamer Oct 21 '11 at 20:54
2  
There's a fairly heinous typo in your CUDA code. You calculate the tid and then throw away the calculated value, having it instead assume the values between 0 and nx*ny. This is almost certainly not what you want to do... see my answer below. –  Patrick87 Oct 21 '11 at 21:46
1  
Not surprised it is slow-the kernel is completely serial. Every thread does the same thing! –  talonmies Oct 22 '11 at 4:10
    
@vivekv: Do give a look at my answer using shared memory –  Programmer Oct 22 '11 at 17:32
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4 Answers

If this is the serial code:

  int i, j;
  for(j=0; j<ny; j++)
  {
      for(i=0; i<nx; i++)
      {
          x[i + j*nx] *= y[i];
      }
  }

then you should be doing this:

  __global__ void fn(float *x, int nx)
  {
     int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
     int j = tid/nx, i = tid - j * nx;
     x[tid] *= y[i];
  }

  fn<<<nx*ny/B, B>>>(x, nx); // with B = 256, 512, etc.

What you're doing is fairly bizarre: you're instructing each thread of the CUDA kernel to iterate over all values of tid between 0 and nx*ny, and compute the same function as your CPU version! Moreover, instead of just iterating over the indices, you're actually doing the loop less efficiently than you did for the CPU version; in other words, you do the same thing in each thread, just less efficiently, than you are doing in 1 thread on the CPU. It's no wonder that this is slower; it should be much, much slower. Your CUDA kernel is:

  int **tid** = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
  int i,j;
  for(**tid** = 0; **tid** <nx*ny; **tid**++)
  {
      j = tid/nx;
      i = tid - j*nx;
      x[tid] *= y[i];
  }

This does nx*ny iterations, same as your host code, for each thread; you lose all benefit of the parallelism, since each thread is doing the same thing; you would get the same performance using one thread on the GPU, and the same result!

If this is the verbatim code from your CUDA source file, you need to change it and redo the comparison; if this is code you have written to help explain what your code is doing for a lay non-CUDA audience, then you need to present your actual CUDA code so that we can see what's going on... as it is, the performance analysis I have done - the trivial one - is all you can expect.

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Given your comment to this answer:

the nx * ny = 2205; so I used no. of blocks = (nx*ny+(threads-1))/threads and threads = 64.

is implying you are intending to launch one thread per computation, the correct CUDA implementation would just be:

int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
int j = tid/nx;
int i = tid - j*nx;

if (tid < (nx*ny))
    x[tid] *= y[i];

If you were intending for each thread to compute more than one computation per kernel launch, then you would size the grid to "fill" each of the SM on the target GPU, not use the same number of threads as the input size, and then do something like:

int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
int gsize = blockDim.x * gridDim.x;
int i,j;

for(; tid <nx*ny; tid+=gsize)
{
    j = tid/nx;
    i = tid - j*nx;
    x[tid] *= y[i];
}

That would get you at least coalesced reads and writes to x, and remove the enormous number of redundant calculations in your posted version. There are a number of further optimizations that could be made, but it would require more information about the problem than has been supplied in the question and subsequent comments. Your indexing scheme contains an integer division and then an integer multiply-add per calculation. That is a lot of overhead for a single FLOP per input value. However, having said all of that, if the problem size I quoted is that actual problem size you are interested in, the GPU will never be faster than even a modest host CPU. You would require many orders of magnitude larger problems to realize useful speed up using the GPU for this sort low arithmetic intensity operation.

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I see this coalesced kernel called in the Visual Profiler when I run a small case of 2205 elements. However, for a very large case of about 20 million elements, I don't see the kernel called in the profiler. So, i am trying to see if there's an improvement in the execution time by using the coalesced read access method as per you described with my crude implementation. Any thoughts? I am using a C2070 btw and I am using CUDA_SAFE_CALL to make sure that cudaMemcopy gives me an error if the dataset does not fill on the GPU. –  vivekv80 Oct 27 '11 at 21:28
    
@vivekv80: Edit a fuller description of your implementation (preferable a concise repro case) into your original question and somebody might be able to take a look at it. –  talonmies Oct 28 '11 at 12:04
    
can this be implemented using shared memory?? –  vivekv80 Dec 12 '11 at 5:23
    
I don't really see where there would be any advantage in doing so. But like I said two months ago post some real code if you want a more concrete answer on performance or optimization. But really, it seems like your main problem is a continuing lack of understanding of the CUDA execution model. I would focus on that before worrying about performance or optimization. –  talonmies Dec 15 '11 at 16:43
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How big is the block? it may be that the time needed to copy a small amount of data to the GPU and setup the envirnoment is much longer than the calculation time.

Remember also that CUDA does a jit compile on the first run so to get accurate benchmarking you need to run it many times.

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the nx * ny = 2205; so I used no. of blocks = (nx*ny+(threads-1))/threads and threads = 64. –  vivekv80 Oct 21 '11 at 20:56
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Try this using shared memory. One of the best implementations around:

// Matrices are stored in row-major order:
// M(row, col) = *(M.elements + row * M.stride + col)
typedef struct {
   int width;
   int height;
   int stride; // In number of elements
   float *elements;
} Matrix;

// Thread block size
#define BLOCK_SIZE 16

// Get a matrix element
__device__ float GetElement(const Matrix A, int row, int col)
{
   return A.elements[row * A.stride + col];
}

// Set a matrix element
__device__ void SetElement(Matrix A, int row, int col, float value)
{
   A.elements[row * A.stride + col] = value;
}
// Get the BLOCK_SIZExBLOCK_SIZE sub-matrix Asub of A that is
// located col sub-matrices to the right and row sub-matrices down
// from the upper-left corner of A
__device__ Matrix GetSubMatrix(Matrix A, int row, int col)
{
   Matrix Asub;
   Asub.width = BLOCK_SIZE; Asub.height = BLOCK_SIZE;
   Asub.stride = A.stride;
   Asub.elements = &A.elements[A.stride * BLOCK_SIZE * row + 
                               BLOCK_SIZE * col];
   return Asub;
}

// Forward declaration of the matrix multiplication kernel
__global__ void MatMulKernel(const Matrix, const Matrix, Matrix);

// Matrix multiplication - Host code
// Matrix dimensions are assumed to be multiples of BLOCK_SIZE
void MatMul(const Matrix A, const Matrix B, Matrix C)
{
   // Same as in previous example, except the followings:
   // d_A.width = d_A.stride = A.width;
   // d_B.width = d_B.stride = B.width;
   // d_C.width = d_C.stride = C.width;
}
// Matrix multiplication kernel called by MatMul()
__global__ void MatMulKernel(Matrix A, Matrix B, Matrix C)
{
   // Block row and column
   int blockRow = blockIdx.y;
   int blockCol = blockIdx.x;

   // Each thread block computes one sub-matrix Csub of C
   Matrix Csub = GetSubMatrix(C, blockRow, blockCol);

   // Each thread computes one element of Csub
   // by accumulating results into Cvalue
   float Cvalue = 0;

   // Thread row and column within Csub
   int row = threadIdx.y;
   int col = threadIdx.x;
// Loop over all the sub-matrices of A and B that are
   // required to compute Csub
   // Multiply each pair of sub-matrices together
   // and accumulate the results
   for (int m = 0; m < (A.width / BLOCK_SIZE); ++m) 
   {
      // Get sub-matrix Asub of A and Bsub of B
      Matrix Asub = GetSubMatrix(A, blockRow, m);
      Matrix Bsub = GetSubMatrix(B, m, blockCol);

      // Shared memory used to store Asub and Bsub respectively
      __shared__ float As[BLOCK_SIZE][BLOCK_SIZE];
      __shared__ float Bs[BLOCK_SIZE][BLOCK_SIZE];

      // Load Asub and Bsub from device memory to shared memory
      // Each thread loads one element of each sub-matrix
      As[row][col] = GetElement(Asub, row, col);
      Bs[row][col] = GetElement(Bsub, row, col);

      // Synchronize to make sure the sub-matrices are loaded
      // before starting the computation
      __syncthreads();
      // Multiply Asub and Bsub together
      for (int e = 0; e < BLOCK_SIZE; ++e)
         Cvalue += As[row][e] * Bs[e][col];

      // Synchronize to make sure that the preceding
      // computation is done before loading two new
      // sub-matrices of A and B in the next iteration
      __syncthreads();
   }

   // Write Csub to device memory
   // Each thread writes one element
   SetElement(Csub, row, col, Cvalue);
}
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This code does not perform the operation the Questioner is asking about. –  talonmies Oct 22 '11 at 19:46
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