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I have two table A and B with one to many relationship. Both tables have a id field, which is auto-incremented. Table B also has a foreign key field references table A's id field.

Here is the table schema for MySQL DB:

CREATE TABLE A (
id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
afield varchar(255),
PRIMARY KEY (id)
) ;

CREATE TABLE B (
  `id` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `aId` INT NOT NULL,
  `bfield` varchar(255),
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`aId`)REFERENCES A(`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ;

The classes:

@Entity
@Table(name = "A")
public class A implements java.io.Serializable {

private Integer id;
private String aField;

private List b;

public A() {}

public A(Integer id) {
this.id = id;
}

@Id
@Column(name = "id", unique = true, nullable = false)
@GenericGenerator(name = "generator", strategy = "native")
@GeneratedValue(generator = "generator")
public Integer getId() {
return this.id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
this.id = id;
}

@Column(name = "AFIELD", length = 50)
public String getAField() {
return this.aField;
}

public void setAField(String aField) {
this.aField = aField;
}

//mapped by = "a" a is a field in B. Case sensetive @OneToMany(cascade = {CascadeType.ALL}, fetch = FetchType.LAZY, orphanRemoval = true, mappedBy = "a")
public List getB() {
return b;
}

public void setB(List b) {
this.b = b;
}
}

@Entity
@Table(name = "B")
public class B implements java.io.Serializable {

private String bField;
private Integer id;
private Integer aId;

private A a;

public B() {}

@Id
@Column(name = "id", unique = true, nullable = false)
@GenericGenerator(name = "generator", strategy = "native")
@GeneratedValue(generator = "generator")
public Integer getId() {
return this.id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
this.id = id;
}

@Column(name = "aId")
public Integer getAId() {
return this.aId;
}

public void setAId(Integer aId) {
this.aId = aId;
}

@Column(name = "BFIELD", length = 50)
public String getBField() {
return this.bField;
}

public void setBField(String bField) {
this.bField = bField;
}

@ManyToOne
@JoinColumn(name = "aId", insertable = false, updatable = false)
public A getA() {
return a;
}

public void setA(A a) {
this.a = a;
}
}

Following is my test method:

public static void main(String[] args) {
try {
Configuration cfg = new Configuration().configure();
SessionFactory factory = cfg.buildSessionFactory();
Session sess = factory.getCurrentSession();
Transaction tx = sess.beginTransaction();
A a = new A();
a.setAField("afield");
// sess.save(a);
// sess.flush();

  List<B> bs = new ArrayList<B>();<br />
  a.setB(bs);<br />
  B b = new B();<br />
  b.setBField("bfield");<br />

// b.setAId(a.getId());
bs.add(b);

  sess.saveOrUpdate(a);<br />
  tx.commit();<br />
  factory.close();<br />
} <br />
catch (Throwable ex) {<br />
  throw new ExceptionInInitializerError(ex);<br />
}  <br />

}

With the commented-out three lines enabled, it works fine. Basically it gets the id from object a and set it to object b.

But I am not happy I need to save a object before save the list of b objects. Is there anyway that it would work without the three commented-out lines? The scenario is other people may just create object a and set a list object b then save object a since they don't know the detail of the relationship of the two objects and they don't know the schema as well.

Any help is highly appreciated!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Please please take some time formatting your question before submitting it.

That said : The aId column in table B is mapped twice : once for the aId field, and once for a. This aId column should disappear. You should only have the association from B to A. If you want the ID of A form B, just call b.getA().getId().

The other important point is that you have a bidirectional association. You should make sure that the entity graph is coherent. if you add a B to the list of Bs of an A, you must also set the A field in B :

a.getBs().add(b);
b.setA(a);

Hibernate only looks at one side of the association to know what to persist. This side is the one which doesn't have the mappedBy attribute. This means that you absolutely have to call b.setA(a) to make it work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I am afraid I am lost. You said to make it persited I need to use b.setA(a). Actually I don't need to do that for normal situation at all. I only need to set B list in A to make both A and B persisted without problem. The problem only happen when the aId is A's primary key and it is generated natively. –  user1007852 Oct 22 '11 at 1:30
    
Look in docs.jboss.org/hibernate/core/3.6/reference/en-US/html_single/… how a bidirectional one-to-many association is supposed to be mapped. The owning side is the side that Hibernate uses to decide is the association exists or not. It has to be initialized. –  JB Nizet Oct 22 '11 at 8:19

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