Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an issue where I need to map two inputs to a single output.

I'm aware that a dictionary is a generically typed linear mapping:

for every x (key) there may be a y (value)

What I need is a multi-dimensional mapping:

for every x,y (key) there may be a z (value)

But of course the kicker is that I need it to support generic typing and be dynamically sized.

Does this data-structure exist in C#, or do I have to create a dictionary of dictionaries? I'd rather not reinvent the wheel if I don't have to.


Reinventing the wheel:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace zlib.Collections
{
    public class Dictionary3D<Tx, Ty, Tz>
    {
        private Dictionary<Tuple<Tx, Ty>, Tz> _dict = new Dictionary<Tuple<Tx, Ty>, Tz>();

        public void Add(Tx x, Ty y, Tz z)
        {
            _dict.Add(Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y), z);
        }

        public void Clear()
        {
            _dict.Clear();
        }

        public bool ContainsKey(Tx x, Ty y)
        {
            return _dict.ContainsKey(Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y));
        }

        public bool ContainsValue(Tz z)
        {
            return _dict.ContainsValue(z);
        }

        public Dictionary<Tuple<Tx, Ty>, Tz>.Enumerator GetEnumerator()
        {
            return _dict.GetEnumerator();
        }

        public bool Remove(Tx x, Ty y)
        {
            return _dict.Remove(Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y));
        }

        public bool TryGetValue(Tx x, Ty y, out Tz z)
        {
            return _dict.TryGetValue(Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y), out z);
        }

        public int Count
        {
            get { return _dict.Count; }
        }

        public Dictionary<Tuple<Tx,Ty>,Tz>.KeyCollection Keys
        {
            get
            {
                return _dict.Keys;
            }
        }

        public Dictionary<Tuple<Tx, Ty>, Tz>.ValueCollection Values
        {
            get
            {
                return _dict.Values;
            }
        }

        public Tz this[Tx x, Ty y]
        {
            get
            {
                return _dict[Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y)];
            }
            set
            {
                _dict[Tuple.Create<Tx, Ty>(x, y)] = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

It seems like reinventing the wheel is winning out among responses. This is the code I've come up with so far, but I feel like there should be a better way, like a matrix or something.

share|improve this question
    
is the type of key the same for both x and y? can you explain how you need generic typing for a key? heterogeneous key? –  DarthVader Oct 21 '11 at 21:52
    
@DarthVader, the type for the keys could be the same in some circumstances, but it wont always be. –  zzzzBov Oct 21 '11 at 21:59
    
I suppose i should also specify, the type of the key will be specific to the instance of the multi-dimensional object. Ideally I'd be able to write new Dictionary3D<Foo,Bar,Baz>(); and have it work just as well as new Dictionary3D<int,int,bool>();. –  zzzzBov Oct 21 '11 at 22:03
    
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

what about

   Dictionary<Tuple<T,K>,Tuple<L,J>> 

??

share|improve this answer
    
After messing around with creating a custom class that acted as a wrapper, I decided that it really wasn't worth it for the little bit of code needed to create new Tuples. –  zzzzBov Oct 25 '11 at 20:23
add comment

If I get you right, that is what you need:

class Key<Tx, Ty>
{
    public Tx x;
    public Ty y;

    public Key(Tx x, Ty y)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}

Dictionary<Key<Tx, Ty>, Tz> d;

And yes, how mentioned in a comment, you gotta implement HashCode and Equals in that Key class.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a Tuple<T1,T2> –  Jota Oct 21 '11 at 22:16
    
Ouch, sorry, didn't know about that. –  mephisto123 Oct 21 '11 at 22:19
    
Been there, done that :) –  Jota Oct 21 '11 at 22:20
add comment

The PolyDictionary that Chuck Jazdzewski wrote about awhile back might get you what you want if you use a Tuple<T1, T2> as the key. Really, it's just a wrapper around a Dictionary<object, object> but it does the trick. Check out his blog series on the topic:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Tuple is probably what you want:

var population = new Tuple< string, int>("New York", 7891957);

or for generics:

var population = new Tuple< S, T>("New York", 7891957);

For Tuple a reference look here

Moreover, if you want for example user Dictionary of a Dictionary you can do like this:

using DictOfDict = Dictionary< X, Dictionary< Y, Z>> ;

For a reference look here

share|improve this answer
add comment

How about this:

class Dict3D
{
    private Dictionary<KeyValuePair<object,object>, object> innnerDict= new Dictionary<KeyValuePair<object,object>, object>();

    public object Get(object key1, object key2)
    {
        KeyValuePair<object,object> bigKey = new KeyValuePair<object, object>(key1, key2);
        if (innnerDict.ContainsKey(bigKey))
        {
            return innnerDict[bigKey];
        }
        return null;
    }

    public void Set(object key1, object key2, object somevalue)
    {
        KeyValuePair<object, object> bigKey = new KeyValuePair<object, object>(key1, key2);
        if (innnerDict.ContainsKey(bigKey))
        {
            innnerDict[bigKey] = somevalue;
        }
        else
        {
            innnerDict.Add(bigKey, somevalue);
        }
    }
}

You could make it a generic also, but this is a simple version.

I guess the answers mean that if you want a clean solution, you (or someone else) probably does have to reinvent the wheel.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you will need a type safe heterogeneous container, which is backed by a dictionary. In this case, you will have to override IDictionary and have your own impl. Unfortunately there is no class that you can use unless you follow other answers or find a work around i guess.

See Joshua bloch in this case, you can basically store any type as the key. however you can restrict that as well.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.