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I have created a library class CircuitController that communicates with a control circuit via serial port.

public class CircuitController
{
   // Enumerations.
   public enum Sensors { Sensor1, Sensor2, ..., Sensor15 };
   ...

   // Fields.
   private SerialPort serialPort;  // Set in constructor.
   private Dictionary<Sensors, Sensor> activeSensorCollection;
   ...

   // Properties.
   public Dictionary<Sensors, Sensor> ActiveSensors
   { get { return this.activeSensorCollection; } }       

   // Methods.
   public void SetSensorUnits(Sensors sensor, String sensorUnits)
   {
      // Creates serial command based off parameters, sends, receives, processes.
   }
   ...

   // Constructors.
   public CircuitController(...)
   {
      ... // Set CircuitController fields including nested classes.
      Sensor sensor1 = new Sensor(a,b,c,d,this);  // Link sensor to this controller instance.
      ... // Add sensors to dictionary.
   }          

   // Nested Classes.
   public class Sensor
   {
      // Fields.
      private CircuitController controller;   
      private String units;
      private Sensors sensorNumber;
      ...

      // Properties.
      public String Units
      {
         get
         {
            return this.controller.GetSensorUnits(this.sensorNumber);
         }
         set
         {
            this.controller.SetSensorUnits(this.sensorNumber, value);
          }
      }
      ...
   }

So here is my questions: Is it OK to allow the user to get/set the sensor settings through properties even though an exception may be thrown (e.g. serial communication error)?

String sensor2Units = circuitControllerInstance.ActiveSensors[Sensor2].Units'
circuitControllerInstance.ActiveSensors[Sensor1].Units = "mm";

I find this much clearer than...

String sensor2Units = circuitControllerInstance.GetSensorUnits(Sensors.Sensor2);
circuitControllerInstance.SetSensorUnits(Sensors.Sensor1, "mm");

Please note that these are simplified examples, some of the Get/Set methods have up to 5 parameters which would be a hassle to repeatedly type out. :/

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would tend to avoid actually doing anything when a property is set. Instead let all the properties be set in memory, then add a "Save" method that will "save" the properties to the serial device.

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I agree. That is the way to go. –  Salvatore Previti Oct 21 '11 at 23:15
    
Great. Thank you. –  john Oct 24 '11 at 15:48

I tend to favor read-only properties for things which can, regardless of object state, be examined without risk of exception, read-write properties for things which can, regardless of object state, be examined or set to any object value which is ever valid (i.e. the set of valid values shouldn't depend upon the object state), and getter/setter methods for other things. Setting one read-write property may affect the value of other read-only properties, but it should not affect the value of any other read-write properties.

In some cases where many attributes of a function will have to be set at once, it may be useful to have a pair of methods to copy the object's state to a struct, and to read an object's state from a struct. Some people seem to think it would be evil to use a struct for such purposes, because in code like:

struct MyPropertyStruct
{
  Rectangle bounds;
  ...
}
...
  MyPropertyStruct myProperties;

  someObject.GetProperties(ref myProperties);
  myProperties.Bounds.Left += 4;

won't affect someObject, but will merely affect the copy of the properties stored in myProperties unless or until one does a "someObject.SetProperties(ref myProperties)". I would suggest the opposite: if myProperties is a struct containing only value types or immutable reference types, any competent programmer will know that, by definition, value types aren't bound to anything else. By contrast, if GetProperties were to return a class type, a programmer looking at the code would have no way of knowing to what effect changing the returned object might have.

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